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Born Under a Lucky Star?

Author

Listed:
  • Nobuyuki Hanaki
  • Alan Kirman
  • Matteo Marsili

Abstract

This paper suggests that people can learn to behave in a way which makes them unlucky or lucky. Learning from experience will lead them to make choices which may lead to "luckier" outcomes than others. By so doing they may reinforce the choices of those who find themselves with unlucky outcomes. In this situation, people have reasonably learned to behave as they do and their behaviour is consistent with their experience. The lucky ones were not "born under a lucky star" they learned to be lucky.

Suggested Citation

  • Nobuyuki Hanaki & Alan Kirman & Matteo Marsili, 2009. "Born Under a Lucky Star?," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2009-003, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
  • Handle: RePEc:tsu:tewpjp:2009-003
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    File URL: http://www.econ.tsukuba.ac.jp/RePEc/2009-003.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    11. McAfee R. Preston & Vincent Daniel, 1993. "The Declining Price Anomaly," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 191-212, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aleksandra Aloric & Peter Sollich & Peter McBurney & Tobias Galla, 2015. "Emergence of Cooperative Long-term Market Loyalty in Double Auction Markets," Papers 1510.07927, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2017.
    2. Takashi Yamada & Nobuyuki Hanaki, 2016. "An Experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games," Post-Print halshs-01204814, HAL.
    3. Yamada, Takashi & Hanaki, Nobuyuki, 2016. "An experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 463(C), pages 88-102.
    4. Aleksandra Alori'c & Peter Sollich & Peter McBurney, 2017. "Spontaneous Segregation of Agents Across Double Auction Markets," Papers 1708.09327, arXiv.org.

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