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Hours Worked and Permanent Technology Shocks in Open Economies

  • Dupaigne, Martial
  • Fève, Patrick

We use Structural Vector Autoregressions to study the impact of technology improvements on hours worked in the major seven countries. While previous studies estimate the response of labor input to permanent shocks to country -level labor productivity, we consider the response of labor input to aggregate -level labor productivity. Since labor productivities do cointegrate in the G7, the estimated responses should look very similar. They do not: for each country but Germany, the responses estimated using G7 labor productivity sizeably exceed those estimated using country -level labor productivity. These results also hold in larger SVAR models.

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File URL: http://www.tse-fr.eu/sites/default/files/medias/doc/wp/macro/wp_macro_114_2009.pdf
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Paper provided by Toulouse School of Economics (TSE) in its series TSE Working Papers with number 09-114.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
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Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:22263
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  1. Fabio Canova & Matteo Ciccarelli & Eva Ortega, 2003. "Similarities and convergence in G-7 cycles," Economics Working Papers 924, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Aug 2004.
  2. Gali, J., 1996. "Technology, Employment, and the Business Cycle: Do Technology Shocks Explain Aggregate Fluctuations?," Working Papers 96-28, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  3. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Robert Vigfusson, 2004. "The Response of Hours to a Technology Shock: Evidence Based on Direct Measures of Technology," NBER Working Papers 10254, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Christopher J. Erceg & Luca Guerrieri, 2004. "Can Long-Run Restrictions Identify Technology Shocks?," Computing in Economics and Finance 2004 3, Society for Computational Economics.
  5. Dupaigne, Martial & Fève, Patrick, 2005. "Technology Shocks around the World," IDEI Working Papers 346, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  6. Chari, V.V. & Kehoe, Patrick J. & McGrattan, Ellen R., 2008. "Are structural VARs with long-run restrictions useful in developing business cycle theory?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(8), pages 1337-1352, November.
  7. Ramey, Valerie A & Francis, Neville, 2002. "Is The Technology-Driven Real Business Cycle Hypothesis Dead? Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations Revisted," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt6x80k3nx, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  8. Harald Uhlig, 2004. "Do Technology Shocks Lead to a Fall in Total Hours Worked?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 361-371, 04/05.
  9. Baxter, Marianne & Crucini, Mario J, 1993. "Explaining Saving-Investment Correlations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 416-36, June.
  10. Pau Rabanal & Juan F. Rubio-Ramirez & Vicente Tuesta, 2009. "Cointegrated TFP processes and international business cycles," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2009-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  11. Ayhan Kose, M. & Otrok, Christopher & Whiteman, Charles H., 2008. "Understanding the evolution of world business cycles," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 110-130, May.
  12. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Quah, Danny, 1989. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 655-73, September.
  13. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2003. "Understanding Changes in International Business Cycle Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 9859, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Fabrice Collard & Harris Dellas, 2002. "Technology Shocks and Employment," Diskussionsschriften dp0217, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
  15. Jordi Gali Garreta & Pau Rabanal, 2004. "Technology Shocks and Aggregate Fluctuations; How Well Does the RBC Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data?," IMF Working Papers 04/234, International Monetary Fund.
  16. Martial Dupaigne & Patrick Feve, 2008. "Online Appendix to "Technology shocks around the world"," Technical Appendices 08-23, Review of Economic Dynamics.
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