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Voluntary Disclosure Programs for Tax Evaders

Author

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  • Heiner Schmittdiel

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands)

Abstract

In this paper, we develop a model that can explain why governments may want to choose to offer a voluntary disclosure program that allows people who withheld taxes to turn themselves in without punishment. We find that such a leniency rule not only increases government revenue when it comes as a surprise, but even when taxpayers anticipate it.

Suggested Citation

  • Heiner Schmittdiel, 2015. "Voluntary Disclosure Programs for Tax Evaders," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-128/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20150128
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    File URL: https://papers.tinbergen.nl/15128.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Langenmayr, Dominika, 2017. "Voluntary disclosure of evaded taxes — Increasing revenue, or increasing incentives to evade?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 110-125.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tax compliance; voluntary disclosure; guilt;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • K34 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Tax Law
    • K40 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - General

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