IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/tem/wpaper/1202.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Trade and Inequality in a Directed Search Model with Firm and Worker Heterogeneity

Author

Listed:
  • Moritz Ritter

    () (Department of Economics, Temple University)

Abstract

This paper integrates the insight that exporting firms are typically more productive and employ higher skilled workers into a directed search model of the labor market. The model generates a skill premium as well as residual wage inequality among identical workers. A trade liberalization will cause a reallocation of workers both within and across industries. The within industry reallocation increases the skill premium, increases residual inequality for low-skilled workers, and decreases residual inequality for high-skilled workers. The across industry reallocation induces the well-known Stolper-Samuleson effect. The calibrated model generates results consistent with the prior literature examining the effect of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement on the Canadian labor market: a signiï¬ cant decrease in employment in manufacturing, but only a small change in wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Moritz Ritter, 2012. "Trade and Inequality in a Directed Search Model with Firm and Worker Heterogeneity," DETU Working Papers 1202, Department of Economics, Temple University.
  • Handle: RePEc:tem:wpaper:1202
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.cla.temple.edu/RePEc/documents/detu_2012_02.pdf
    File Function: First Version, 2012
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James Townsend, 2007. "Do tariff reductions affect the wages of workers in protected industries? Evidence from the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(1), pages 69-92, February.
    2. Balistreri, Edward J. & Hillberry, Russell H. & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2011. "Structural estimation and solution of international trade models with heterogeneous firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 95-108, March.
    3. Davidson, Carl & Matusz, Steven J. & Shevchenko, Andrei, 2008. "Outsourcing Peter To Pay Paul: High-Skill Expectations And Low-Skill Wages With Imperfect Labor Markets," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(04), pages 463-479, September.
    4. Jonathan Eaton & Samuel Kortum & Francis Kramarz, 2011. "An Anatomy of International Trade: Evidence From French Firms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(5), pages 1453-1498, September.
    5. Shouyong Shi, 1998. "Frictional Assignment," Working Papers 988, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    6. Elhanan Helpman & Oleg Itskhoki & Stephen Redding, 2010. "Inequality and Unemployment in a Global Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(4), pages 1239-1283, July.
    7. Noel Gaston & Daniel Trefler, 1997. "The Labour Market Consequences of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 30(1), pages 18-41, February.
    8. Davis, Donald R. & Harrigan, James, 2011. "Good jobs, bad jobs, and trade liberalization," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 26-36, May.
    9. John Baldwin & Wulong Gu, 2003. "Export-market participation and productivity performance in Canadian manufacturing," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(3), pages 634-657, August.
    10. Arnaud Costinot & Jonathan Vogel, 2010. "Matching and Inequality in the World Economy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 118(4), pages 747-786, August.
    11. Alla Lileeva, 2008. "Trade liberalization and productivity dynamics: evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(2), pages 360-390, May.
    12. Shouyong Shi, 2002. "A Directed Search Model of Inequality with Heterogeneous Skills and Skill-Biased Technology," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(2), pages 467-491.
    13. repec:ucp:jpolec:doi:10.1086/693373 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Ian King & Frank Stahler, 2010. "A Simple Theory of Trade and Unemployment in General Equilibrium," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1116, The University of Melbourne.
    15. Eugene Beaulieu, 2000. "The Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement and labour market adjustment in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 33(2), pages 540-563, May.
    16. Erhan Artuç & Shubham Chaudhuri & John McLaren, 2010. "Trade Shocks and Labor Adjustment: A Structural Empirical Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 1008-1045, June.
    17. Zhu, Susan Chun & Trefler, Daniel, 2005. "Trade and inequality in developing countries: a general equilibrium analysis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 21-48, January.
    18. Mary Amiti & Donald R. Davis, 2012. "Trade, Firms, and Wages: Theory and Evidence," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(1), pages 1-36.
    19. Davidson, Carl & Matusz, Steven J. & Shevchenko, Andrei, 2008. "Globalization and firm level adjustment with imperfect labor markets," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 295-309, July.
    20. Ariel Burstein & Jonathan Vogel, 2017. "International Trade, Technology, and the Skill Premium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 125(5), pages 1356-1412.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Artuc, Erhan, 2012. "Workers'age and the impact of trade shocks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6035, The World Bank.
    2. Gabriel Felbermayr & Giammario Impullitti & Julien Prat, 2014. "Firm Dynamics and Residual Inequality in Open Economies," CESifo Working Paper Series 4666, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Koch, Michael & Egger, Hartmut, 2013. "Trade and the Firm-Internal Allocation of Workers to Tasks," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79841, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. repec:cup:macdyn:v:21:y:2017:i:03:p:624-643_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Ritter, Moritz, 2017. "Inequality And International Trade: The Role Of Skill-Biased Technology And Search Frictions," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(03), pages 624-643, April.
    6. Erhan Artuc, 2009. "Intergenerational Effects of Trade Liberalization," 2009 Meeting Papers 870, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Artuç, Erhan & McLaren, John, 2015. "Trade policy and wage inequality: A structural analysis with occupational and sectoral mobility," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 278-294.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Directed Search; Inequality; International Trade;

    JEL classification:

    • E25 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Aggregate Factor Income Distribution
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tem:wpaper:1202. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dimitrios Diamantaras). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/edtemus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.