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Are far off hills really greener? The Impact of REPS on Farmer Behaviour

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Listed:
  • Stephen Hynes

    () (Rural Economy and Development Programme, Teagasc, Athenry, Co. Galway, Ireland)

  • Cathal O’Donoghue

    (Rural Economy and Development Programme, Teagasc, Athenry, Co. Galway, Ireland)

  • Eithne Murphy

    (Department of Economics, National University of Ireland, Galway)

  • Ann Kinsella

    (Rural Economy and Development Programme, Teagasc, Athenry, Co. Galway, Ireland)

Abstract

The Rural Environment Protection Scheme (REPS) was introduced under Council Regulation 2078/92 in order to encourage farmers to carry out their activities in a more extensive and environmentally friendly manner. This article, using National Farm Survey (NFS) data, examines the extent to which farming activities that can help or hinder the environment have changed due to farmer participation in the REPS scheme. The analysis shows that REPS has had a substantial impact on the use of chemical nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Also, participation in REPS may have resulted in a more significant reduction in the production of organic nitrogen, organic phosphorous and methane emissions than would have been the case if the REPS farmers in the NFS had not joined the scheme.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Hynes & Cathal O’Donoghue & Eithne Murphy & Ann Kinsella, 2008. "Are far off hills really greener? The Impact of REPS on Farmer Behaviour," Working Papers 0812, Rural Economy and Development Programme,Teagasc.
  • Handle: RePEc:tea:wpaper:0812
    as

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    File URL: http://www.teagasc.ie/rural-economy/downloads/workingpapers/08wpre12.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dillon, Emma J. & Hennessy, Thia C. & Hynes, Stephen & Commins, Verena, 2008. "Assessing the Sustainability of Irish Farming," 107th Seminar, January 30-February 1, 2008, Sevilla, Spain 6474, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Alan Matthews, 2001. "Has agricultural policy responded to the Rio challenge?," Trinity Economics Papers 200114, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    3. Riccardo Scarpa & Danny Campbell & W. George Hutchinson, 2007. "Benefit Estimates for Landscape Improvements: Sequential Bayesian Design and Respondents’ Rationality in a Choice Experiment," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(4), pages 617-634.
    4. Hynes, Stephen & Farrelly, Niall & Murphy, Eithne & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2008. "Modelling habitat conservation and participation in agri-environmental schemes: A spatial microsimulation approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2-3), pages 258-269, June.
    5. Katherine Falconer & Pierre Dupraz & Martin Whitby, 2001. "An Investigation of Policy Administrative Costs Using Panel Data for the English Environmentally Sensitive Areas," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 83-103.
    6. Danny Campbell, 2007. "Willingness to Pay for Rural Landscape Improvements: Combining Mixed Logit and Random-Effects Models," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(3), pages 467-483, September.
    7. Christie, Mike & Hanley, Nick & Warren, John & Murphy, Kevin & Wright, Robert & Hyde, Tony, 2006. "Valuing the diversity of biodiversity," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 304-317, June.
    8. P. Dupraz & D. Vermersch & B. De Frahan & L. Delvaux, 2003. "The Environmental Supply of Farm Households: A Flexible Willingness to Accept Model," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 25(2), pages 171-189, June.
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