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Institutions and Institutional Change in Zambia

Author

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  • Sophia du Plessis

    (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

Abstract

Research has shown a positive correlation between extractive colonisation and low post-colonial economic growth. This paper provides case study research to explore the possibility that post-colonial extractive institutions were already present in pre-colonial times. In Zambia’s case this is indeed true. Extractive institutions existed in Zambia before colonisation, and colonisation certainly did not improve on them. The question whether countries like Zambia are doomed for failure is also considered, and it is concluded that an environment that allows experimentation is supportive of economic growth and development. With an authoritative regime during the Second Republic, feedback on policy decisions was limited and may provide more of an answer to bad post-colonial economic performance than extractive colonisation.

Suggested Citation

  • Sophia du Plessis, 2006. "Institutions and Institutional Change in Zambia," Working Papers 16/2006, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers30
    as

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    File URL: https://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2006/wp162006/wp-16-2006.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
    3. Sachs, J-D & Warner, A-M, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," Papers 517a, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
    4. Dani Rodrik, 2006. "Institutions for High-Quality Growth: What They Are and How to Acquire Them," Chapters, in: Kartik Roy & Jörn Sideras (ed.), Institutions, Globalisation and Empowerment, chapter 2, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 2003. "Tropics, germs, and crops: how endowments influence economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 3-39, January.
    6. Stan Du Plessis & Sophia Du Plessis, 2006. "Explanations for Zambia's economic decline," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 351-369.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Stan du Plessis, 2011. "Nationalising South African mines: Back to a prosperous future, or down a rabbit hole?," Working Papers 17/2011, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Institutions; Institutional Change; Colonisation; Zambia;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N4 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation
    • N9 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy
    • O5 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies

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