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Institutions and Institutional Change in Zambia

  • Sophia du Plessis

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Stellenbosch)

Research has shown a positive correlation between extractive colonisation and low post-colonial economic growth. This paper provides case study research to explore the possibility that post-colonial extractive institutions were already present in pre-colonial times. In Zambia’s case this is indeed true. Extractive institutions existed in Zambia before colonisation, and colonisation certainly did not improve on them. The question whether countries like Zambia are doomed for failure is also considered, and it is concluded that an environment that allows experimentation is supportive of economic growth and development. With an authoritative regime during the Second Republic, feedback on policy decisions was limited and may provide more of an answer to bad post-colonial economic performance than extractive colonisation.

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File URL: http://www.ekon.sun.ac.za/wpapers/2006/wp162006/wp-16-2006.pdf
File Function: First version, 2006
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 16/2006.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:sza:wpaper:wpapers30
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  1. Rodrik, Dani, 2000. "Institutions For High-Quality Growth: What They Are And How To Acquire Them," CEPR Discussion Papers 2370, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Eric Neumayer, 2003. "Does the ‘Resource Curse’ hold for Growth in Genuine Income as well?," Others 0312002, EconWPA, revised 18 May 2004.
  3. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2000. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 7771, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 2003. "Tropics, germs, and crops: how endowments influence economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 3-39, January.
  6. Stan Du Plessis & Sophia Du Plessis, 2006. "Explanations for Zambia's economic decline," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 351-369.
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