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Social choice among complex objects

  • Luigi Marengo
  • Simona Settepanella

We present a geometric model of social choice when the latter takes place among bundles of interdependent elements, that we will call objects. We show that the outcome of the social choice process is highly dependent on the way these bundles are formed. By bundling and unbundling the same set of constituent elements an authority has the power of determine the social outcome. We provide necessary and sufficient conditions under which a social outcome may be a local or global optimum for a set of objects, and we show that, by appropriately redefining the set of objects, intransitive cycles may be broken and the median voter may be turned into a loser.

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Paper provided by Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy in its series LEM Papers Series with number 2010/02.

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Date of creation: 13 Jan 2010
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Handle: RePEc:ssa:lemwps:2010/02
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  1. Luigi Maregno & Corrado Pasquali, 2008. "A computational voting model," LEM Papers Series 2008/24, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  2. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1983. "Social choice and game theory: recent results with a topological approach," MPRA Paper 8059, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1980. "Social choice and the topology of spaces of preferences," MPRA Paper 8006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Sendhil Mullainathan & Joshua Schwartzstein & Andrei Shleifer, 2008. "Coarse Thinking and Persuasion," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 123(2), pages 577-619, 05.
  5. Fryer Roland & Jackson Matthew O., 2008. "A Categorical Model of Cognition and Biased Decision Making," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-44, February.
  6. Plott, Charles R. & Levine, Michael E., . "A Model of Agenda Influence on Committee Decisions," Working Papers 143, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  7. Weinberger, Shmuel, 2004. "On the topological social choice model," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 377-384, April.
  8. Yuliy M. Baryshnikov, 1997. "Topological and discrete social choice: in a search of a theory," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 199-209.
  9. Bernholz, Peter, 1974. "Logrolling, Arrow-Paradox and Decision Rules-A Generalization," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(1), pages 49-62.
  10. Callander, Steven & Wilson, Catherine H., 2006. "Context-dependent Voting," Quarterly Journal of Political Science, now publishers, vol. 1(3), pages 227-254, July.
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