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Social inclusion in an alternative food network: values, practices and tensions

Author

Listed:
  • Catherine Closson
  • Estelle Fourat
  • Laurence Holzemer
  • Marek Hudon

Abstract

This paper explores challenges a consumer food cooperative must address to combine social inclusion and embeddedness in its urban environment with the food quality standards it targets. While the difficulty in making alternative food networks (AFNs) socially accessible is well documented, little is known about organizational practices that foster inclusion in AFNs. Our research—based on over 100 participant observations of meetings held at the cooperative and on food activities with members of community organizations—has generated insight on how a participative process—through collective decisions, knowledge exchanges and workslot commitments—could facilitate or restrain social inclusion. Our results suggest that promotion of the value of equality for the largest number is hindered by differences in food, material and consumer cultures between cooperative members and non-members. The value of equality for the largest number is pragmatically applied through social inclusion regarding food supply and voluntary work participation.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine Closson & Estelle Fourat & Laurence Holzemer & Marek Hudon, 2019. "Social inclusion in an alternative food network: values, practices and tensions," Working Papers CEB 19-003, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:sol:wpaper:2013/280933
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Henk Renting & Terry K Marsden & Jo Banks, 2003. "Understanding Alternative Food Networks: Exploring the Role of Short Food Supply Chains in Rural Development," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 35(3), pages 393-411, March.
    2. Yuna Chiffoleau & Sarah Millet-Amrani & Arielle Canard, 2016. "From Short Food Supply Chains to Sustainable Agriculture in Urban Food Systems: Food Democracy as a Vector of Transition," Agriculture, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(4), pages 1-18, October.
    3. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:79:y:2018:i:c:p:300-308 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Patricia Allen, 1999. "Reweaving the food security safety net: Mediating entitlement and entrepreneurship," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 16(2), pages 117-129, June.
    5. Henk Renting & Terry K Marsden & Jo Banks, 2003. "Understanding alternative food networks: exploring the role of short food supply chains in rural development," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(3), pages 393-411, March.
    6. Aubry, Christine & Kebir, Leïla, 2013. "Shortening food supply chains: A means for maintaining agriculture close to urban areas? The case of the French metropolitan area of Paris," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 85-93.
    7. Salais, Robert & Storper, Michael, 1992. "The Four 'Worlds' of Contemporary Industry," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 169-193, June.
    8. Trebbin, Anika, 2014. "Linking small farmers to modern retail through producer organizations – Experiences with producer companies in India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 35-44.
    9. Nicole Darmon & Adam Drewnowski, 2015. "Contribution of food prices and diet cost to socioeconomic disparities in diet quality and health: a systematic review and analysis," Post-Print hal-01774670, HAL.
    10. repec:eee:ecolec:v:140:y:2017:i:c:p:123-135 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Sarah Whatmore & Pierre Stassart & Henk Renting, 2003. "What's alternative about alternative food networks?," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 35(3), pages 389-391, March.
    12. Sini Forssell & Leena Lankoski, 2015. "The sustainability promise of alternative food networks: an examination through “alternative” characteristics," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 32(1), pages 63-75, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Alternative food network; Participatory action research; Consumer food cooperative; Social inclusion; Accessibility; Food democracy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General
    • O35 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Social Innovation

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