IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

The dynamics of international trade in cereals, 1900-1938

Listed author(s):
  • Gema Aparicio

    ()

  • Vicente Pinilla

    ()

The aim of this paper is to analyse the dynamics of international trade in cereals in the first third of the twentieth century. To this end we will study its evolution over this period, comparing it also with the general trade of food and agricultural products. In addition, we will examine the structure of this trade. For wheat, maize and rice we will examine the operation of their respective markets, with special attention to the import and export flows between consumers and producers. To better understand the functioning of the market for these products, we will examine the changes in supply, demand and prices.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://repositori.uji.es/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10234/137656/DT-SEHA%201504.pdf?sequence=1
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Sociedad Española de Historia Agraria in its series Documentos de Trabajo de la Sociedad Española de Historia Agraria with number 1504.

as
in new window

Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2015
Handle: RePEc:seh:wpaper:1504
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.seha.info

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Olmstead,Alan L. & Rhode,Paul W., 2008. "Creating Abundance," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521857116, December.
  2. Brandt Loren, 1993. "Interwar Japanese Agriculture: Revisionist Views on the Impact of the Colonial Rice Policy and the Labor-Surplus Hypothesis," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 259-293, July.
  3. Jacks, David S., 2006. "What drove 19th century commodity market integration?," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 383-412, July.
  4. Sharp, Paul & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2013. "Globalization revisited: Market integration and the wheat trade between North America and Britain from the eighteenth century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 88-98.
  5. Anonymous, 1932. "The World Wheat Problem," Wheat Studies, Stanford University, Food Research Institute, issue 08, July.
  6. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2001. "Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Economy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262650592, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:seh:wpaper:1504. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Antonio Linares)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.