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Are Children Rational Decision Makers when they are Asked to Value their own Health? A Contingent Valuation Study Conducted with Children and their Parents

Author

Listed:
  • Carla Guerriero

    (Università di Napoli Federico II and CSEF)

  • John Cairns

    (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)

  • Fabrizio Bianchi

    (IFC CNR Pisa)

  • Liliana Cori

    (IFC CNR Pisa)

Abstract

Despite the importance of including children’s preferences in the valuation of their own health benefits no study investigated the ability of children to understand willingness to pay questions. Using a contingent valuation study we elicit children’s and parents’ willingness to pay (WTP) to reduce children’s risk of an asthma attack. Our results suggest that children are able to understand and value their own health risk reductions and their ability to do so improves with age. Child age was found to be inversely related to parents’ and children’s WTP. The results also suggest that non-paternal altruism is predictive of children’s WTP. For parents, care for their own-health, was found to be inversely related with their WTP for children’s risk reductions. Comparison of parents’ vs. children WTP suggest that parents are willing to sacrifice for their child’s health risk reduction an amount that is approximately twice the size of their children. The analysis of matched pairs of parents and children suggest that there are within-household similarities as the child’s WTP is positively related to parents’ WTP.

Suggested Citation

  • Carla Guerriero & John Cairns & Fabrizio Bianchi & Liliana Cori, 2016. "Are Children Rational Decision Makers when they are Asked to Value their own Health? A Contingent Valuation Study Conducted with Children and their Parents," CSEF Working Papers 448, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:sef:csefwp:448
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    File URL: http://www.csef.it/WP/wp448.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Mark Dickie, 2005. "Parental Behavior and the Value of Children's Health: A Health Production Approach," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 71(4), pages 855-872, April.
    3. Dickie, Mark & Messman, Victoria L., 2004. "Parental altruism and the value of avoiding acute illness: are kids worth more than parents?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 1146-1174, November.
    4. Dickie, Mark & Gerking, Shelby, 2007. "Altruism and environmental risks to health of parents and their children," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 323-341, May.
    5. Blomquist, Glenn C. & Dickie, Mark & O'Conor, Richard M., 2011. "Willingness to pay for improving fatality risks and asthma symptoms: Values for children and adults of all ages," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 410-425, May.
    6. Shelby Gerking & Mark Dickie, 2013. "Valuing Reductions in Environmental Risks to Children’s Health," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 5(1), pages 245-260, June.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 25th September 2017
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-09-25 16:00:45

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    willingness to pay; contingent valuation; children’s preferences; children’s rationality;
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