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Dynamically Inconsistent Preferences and Money Demand

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Abstract

This paper focuses on two main issues. First, we find that, on average, households’ discount rates decline. This implies dynamically inconsistent preferences. Second, we calculate an indicator of the degree of dynamic inconsistency that may help us to understand how households overcome their self-control problems. We use a micro dataset containing households’ reports on the compensation for receiving hypothetical rewards with delays. We find that individuals with more severely dynamicly inconsistent preferences on average hold a statistically significantly lower share of their total wealth in checking accounts. A possible interpretation is that subjects use precommitment strategies to limit their temptation to consume immediately.

Suggested Citation

  • Emanuele Millemaci & Robert J. Waldmann, 2008. "Dynamically Inconsistent Preferences and Money Demand," CEIS Research Paper 129, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 09 Sep 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:rtv:ceisrp:129
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Luigi Giamboni & Emanuele Millemaci & Robert J. Waldmann, 2013. "Evaluating how predictable errors in expected income affect consumption," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(28), pages 4004-4021, October.
    7. Thaler, Richard H & Shefrin, H M, 1981. "An Economic Theory of Self-Control," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(2), pages 392-406, April.
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    1. I am storing pdf's at google sites so you can see my research
      by Robert in Robert's Stochastic Thoughts on 2009-03-16 16:09:00

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Behavioral Economics; Intertemporal choice; Hyperbolic Discounting; Dynamic Inconsistency; Precommitment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D90 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - General

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