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Why Isn’t India a Major Global Player? The Political Economy of Trade Liberalization

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  • Jayanta Roy
  • Pritam Banerjee

Abstract

The policy reforms initiated in India in the mid-1980s and expanded in 1991 helped support an expansion in India’s trade. Trade reforms since the mid-1990s have been piecemeal. This paper argues that without significant further reform and adoption of a focused trade strategy, the competitiveness of India’s industry will suffer, including in areas such as information technology and related services in which India has established a strong global niche. Critical building blocks of such strategic reforms include further reductions in tariffs, opening services sectors to foreign competition, serious initiatives to reduce trade transaction costs that prioritize integration into international supply-chains, and a greater focus on regional integration.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayanta Roy & Pritam Banerjee, 2013. "Why Isn’t India a Major Global Player? The Political Economy of Trade Liberalization," RSCAS Working Papers 2013/84, European University Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:rsc:rsceui:2013/84
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard E. Baldwin, 2011. "Multilateralising Regionalism: Spaghetti Bowls as Building Blocks on the Path to Global Free Trade," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Integration, Volume I, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. T.N. Srinivasan, 2001. "India's Reform of External Sector Policies and Future Multilateral Trade Negotiations," Working Papers 830, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    3. Mattoo, Aaditya & Rathindran, Randeep, 2006. "Measuring Services Trade Liberalization and Its Impact on Economic Growth: An Illustration," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 21, pages 64-98.
    4. Pranab Bardhan, 1997. "Corruption and Development: A Review of Issues," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1320-1346, September.
    5. Robert Koopman & William Powers & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2010. "Give Credit Where Credit Is Due: Tracing Value Added in Global Production Chains," NBER Working Papers 16426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    India; political economy; trade policy; economic development;

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