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Creativity-Enhancing Technological Change in the Production of Scientific Knowledge

Author

Listed:
  • Link, Al

    () (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics)

  • Scott, John

    (Dartmouth College)

Abstract

We view scientific publications as a measure of technical knowledge. Using the Solow method of functional decomposition and scientific publication data from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, we find that 79 percent if the increase of scientific publications per unit of scientific personnel is explained by an increase in federal R&D capital per unit of scientific personnel. We describe the unexplained or residual 21 percent as a measure of creativity-enhancing technological change, a phenomenon that offers a way to reverse the perceived slowing of the productivity of science. The explained 79 percent offers a possible metric for federal laboratories' mandated reporting of a ROI to federal R&D. Understanding the drivers of the residual 21 percent could enable public policy to mitigate the resource constraints caused by the breakdown of exponential growth of the resources devoted to science.

Suggested Citation

  • Link, Al & Scott, John, 2019. "Creativity-Enhancing Technological Change in the Production of Scientific Knowledge," UNCG Economics Working Papers 19-7, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:uncgec:2019_007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert D. Shelton, 2008. "Relations between national research investment and publication output: Application to an American Paradox," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 74(2), pages 191-205, February.
    2. Hall, Bronwyn H & Ziedonis, Rosemarie Ham, 2001. "The Patent Paradox Revisited: An Empirical Study of Patenting in the U.S. Semiconductor Industry, 1979-1995," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 32(1), pages 101-128, Spring.
    3. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters, in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 17-45, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Scherer, F. M., 1983. "The propensity to patent," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 107-128, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Albert N. Link, 0. "Knowledge transfers from federally supported R&D," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-12.
    2. Link, Albert & Scott, John, 2019. "Technological Change in the Production of New Scientific Knowledge: A Second Look," UNCG Economics Working Papers 19-14, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    scientific publications; technological change; R&D; knowledge production function;

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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