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Just How Innovative are New Zealand Firms? Quantifying & Relating Organisational and Marketing Innovation to Traditional Science & Technology Indicators

  • Fabling, Richard

    ()

    (Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand)

In 2006, Statistics New Zealand produced aggregate measures of product, process, organisational & marketing innovation (following the guidelines of the recently-revised Oslo manual). Uniquely, this innovation data has been collected in conjunction with a broader set of qualitative measures of general business practices. We use this dataset to investigate how broader innovation measurement changes our understanding of what an innovative New Zealand firm looks like. We compare and contrast different innovation measures within the 2005 Business Operations Survey cross-section and then, using panel data, we ask how innovation activities and general management practices relate to future innovation outcomes.

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File URL: http://www.med.govt.nz/about-us/publications/publications-by-topic/occasional-papers/2007/07-04-pdf/view
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Paper provided by Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand in its series Occasional Papers with number 07/4.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ris:nzmedo:2007_004
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