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Productivity Panics – Polemics and Realities

Author

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  • Auerbach, Paul

    () (Kingston University London)

Abstract

Widespread uneasiness has emerged concerning a perceived slowdown in productivity growth. The question posed here is whether our destiny is indeed tied to inexorable movements in productivity and innovation, whatever these things may be, or can we build a future contingent upon collective choices and guided by human needs and desires?

Suggested Citation

  • Auerbach, Paul, 2019. "Productivity Panics – Polemics and Realities," Economics Discussion Papers 2019-3, School of Economics, Kingston University London.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:kngedp:2019_003
    as

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    File URL: http://kunet.kingston.ac.uk/~ku33681/RePEc/kin/papers/2019_003.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mathias Binswanger, 2009. "Is there a growth imperative in capitalist economies? a circular flow perspective," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(4), pages 707-727, July.
    2. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2008. "The Role of Cognitive Skills in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(3), pages 607-668, September.
    3. Auerbach, Paul & Sotiropoulos, Dimitris P., 2012. "Revisiting the socialist calculation debate: the role of markets and finance in Hayek’s response to Lange’s challenge," Economics Discussion Papers 2012-6, School of Economics, Kingston University London.
    4. John S. L. McCombie & Marta R. M. Spreafico, 2016. "Kaldor’s ‘technical progress function’ and Verdoorn’s law revisited," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(4), pages 1117-1136.
    5. Robert J. Gordon, 2016. "Perspectives on The Rise and Fall of American Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 72-76, May.
    6. Alexander J. Field, 2003. "The Most Technologically Progressive Decade of the Century," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1399-1413, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Artificial Intelligence; innovation; productivity; Schumpeter; technological change; total factor productivity.;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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