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The Status-Enhancing Power of Sociability

Author

Listed:
  • Alessandro Bucciol

    () (Department of Economics, University of Verona, Italy)

  • Simona Cicognani

    (Department of Economics, University of Verona, Italy; The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis)

  • Luca Zarri

    (Department of Economics, University of Verona, Italy)

Abstract

This paper shows that individuals' sociability plays an important role in explaining where individuals locate themselves in the social ladder, also when their objective location within society (measured through their income, wealth and education) is considered. Using data from the US Health and Retirement Study, we assess individuals' sociability through the number and quality of friendships and attitude towards others (support, social cohesion, reciprocity, cynical hostility, loneliness and discrimination). We find subjective social status to correlate positively with social contact, reciprocity and social cohesion. Individuals with higher life satisfaction seem disconnected from objective elements when subjectively evaluating their social status.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandro Bucciol & Simona Cicognani & Luca Zarri, 2017. "The Status-Enhancing Power of Sociability," Working Paper series 17-15, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:17-15
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Subjective social status; Objectively measured social status; Sociability; Personality traits;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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