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Revisiting the macroeconomic effects of labor reallocation

Author

Listed:
  • Emmanouil Gkiourkas

    (Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, Greece)

  • Theodore Panagiotidis

    () (Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, Greece; The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis)

  • Gianluigi Pelloni

    (The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis; Department of Economics, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada; Department of Economics, University of Bologna, Italy)

Abstract

We revisit the macroeconomic effects of labor reallocation within the framework of Campbell and Kuttner (1996). We re-estimate their model, update the sample, and employ generalized and local impulse response functions. We confirm that total employment responses to reallocation shocks remain significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Emmanouil Gkiourkas & Theodore Panagiotidis & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2017. "Revisiting the macroeconomic effects of labor reallocation," Working Paper series 17-11, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:17-11
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Quah, Danny, 1989. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 655-673, September.
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    3. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
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    5. Campbell, Jeffrey R. & Kuttner, Kenneth N., 1996. "Macroeconomic effects of employment reallocation," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 87-116, June.
    6. Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, 1999. "Exchange Rates and Jobs: What Do We Learn from Job Flows?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1998, volume 13, pages 153-222 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Theodore Panagiotidis & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2014. "Asymmetry and Lilien’s Sectoral Shifts Hypothesis: A Quantile Regression Approach," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 6(1), pages 68-86, June.
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    11. Lutz Kilian & Robert J. Vigfusson, 2011. "Are the responses of the U.S. economy asymmetric in energy price increases and decreases?," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 2(3), pages 419-453, November.
    12. Giovanni Gallipoli & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2013. "Macroeconomic Effects of Job Reallocations: A Survey," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 5(2), pages 127-176, December.
    13. Lilien, David M, 1982. "Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Unemployment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(4), pages 777-793, August.
    14. Pesaran, H. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 1998. "Generalized impulse response analysis in linear multivariate models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 17-29, January.
    15. John Haltiwanger & Adriana Kugler & Maurice Kugler & Alejandro Micco & Carmen Pages, 2004. "Effects of tariffs and real exchange rates on job reallocation: evidence from Latin America," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(4), pages 191-208.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor reallocation; unemployment; sectoral shifts;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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