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Job Creation, Job Destruction, and International Competition

Author

Listed:
  • Michael W. Klein

    (Tufts University)

  • Scott Schuh

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Boston)

  • Robert K. Triest

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Boston)

Abstract

The authors present a picture of how the effects of international trade on employment in U.S. manufacturing industries vary widely. They explore the labor-market dynamics and adjustment costs associated with international factors, particularly the way fluctuations in exchange rates, overseas economic activity, and the altering of trade restrictions contribute to churning-the simultaneous job creation among some firms and job destruction among others.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael W. Klein & Scott Schuh & Robert K. Triest, 2003. "Job Creation, Job Destruction, and International Competition," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number jcjd, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:jcjd
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mohamed Ali Marouani & Rim Mouelhi, 2014. "Employment Growth, Productivity and Jobs reallocations in Tunisia: A Microdata Analysis," Working Papers DT/2014/13, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    2. Egger, Hartmut & Egger, Peter & Kreickemeier, Udo, 2013. "Trade, wages, and profits," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 332-350.
    3. Francesco Nucci & Alberto Franco Pozzolo, 2014. "Exchange Rate, External Orientation of Firms and Wage Adjustment," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(11), pages 1589-1611, November.
    4. YOKOYAMA Izumi & HIGA Kazuhito & KAWAGUCHI Daiji, 2015. "The Effect of Exchange Rate Fluctuations on Employment in a Segmented Labor Market," Discussion papers 15139, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    5. Rosario Crinò, 2007. "Offshoring, Multinationals and Labor Market: A Review of the Empirical Literature," KITeS Working Papers 196, KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy, revised Jan 2007.
    6. Gkiourkas, Emmanouil & Panagiotidis, Theodore & Pelloni, Gianluigi, 2017. "Revisiting the macroeconomic effects of labor reallocation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 88-93.
    7. Lo Turco, Alessia & Maggioni, Daniela & Picchio, Matteo, 2013. "Offshoring and job stability: Evidence from Italian manufacturing," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 27-46.
    8. Majumdar Sumit K., 2015. "Competitor entry impact on jobs and wages in incumbent firms: retrospective evidence from a natural experiment," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 291-326, August.
    9. Pozzolo, Alberto Franco & Nucci, Francesco, 2008. "Exchange Rate, Employment and Hours: What Firm-Level Data Say," Economics & Statistics Discussion Papers esdp08049, University of Molise, Dept. EGSeI.
    10. Ligia Alba Melo & Carlos Andrés Ballesteros, 2013. "Creación, destrucción y reasignación del empleo en el sector manufacturero colombiano," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 15(28), pages 281-311, January-J.
    11. Egger, Peter & Pfaffermayr, Michael & Weber, Andrea, 2003. "Sectoral Adjustment of Employment: The Impact of Outsourcing and Trade at the Micro Level," IZA Discussion Papers 921, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Luca Marchiori & Olivier Pierrard & Henri R. Sneessens, 2011. "Demography, capital flows and unemployment," CREA Discussion Paper Series 11-14, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    13. Mustafa Caglayan & Firat Demir, 2011. "Firm productivity, exchange rate movements, sources of finance and export orientationInventories and sales uncertainty," Working Papers 2011004, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Feb 2011.
    14. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Duncan, Alan S, 2017. "Exchange rate fluctuations and immigrants' labour market outcomes: New evidence from Australian household panel data," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 174-186.
    15. Giovanni Gallipoli & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2013. "Macroeconomic Effects of Job Reallocations: A Survey," Review of Economic Analysis, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, vol. 5(2), pages 127-176, December.
    16. Ma, Hong & Qiao, Xue & Xu, Yuan, 2015. "Job creation and job destruction in China during 1998–2007," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 1085-1100.
    17. Edgar Trujillo C. & Carlos Esteban Posada, 2006. "El Proteccionismo No Arancelario Y La Coyuntura Económica: El Caso Colombiano Reciente (1990-2005)," Borradores de Economia 399, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    18. Sumit K. Majumdar, 2011. "Cross Subsidization And Telecommunications Sector Wages," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 82(1), pages 1-24, March.
    19. William D. Craighead & David R. Hineline, 2013. "As the Current Account Turns: Disaggregating the Effects of Current Account Reversals in Industrial Countries," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(12), pages 1516-1541, December.
    20. Italo Colantone, 2012. "Trade openness, real exchange rates and job reallocation: evidence from Belgium," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 148(4), pages 669-706, December.
    21. Izumi Yokoyama & Kazuhito Higa & Daiji Kawaguchi, 2018. "Adjustments of regular and non-regular workers to exogenous shocks: Evidence from exchange rate fluctuation," Bank of Japan Working Paper Series 18-E-2, Bank of Japan.
    22. Mark Gius, 2006. "Using Panel Data to Estimate the Effect of the North American Free Trade Agreement on Employment and Wages at the State Level," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), vol. 37(1), pages 20-31.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job creation; job destruction; trade; international trade; international competition; exchange rates;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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