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The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in Developing Countries: Knowledge, Gaps, and Data Needs

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  • Ezzati, Majid
  • Kammen, Daniel

Abstract

Globally, almost three billion people rely on biomass (wood, charcoal, crop residues, and dung) and coal as their primary source of domestic energy. Exposure to indoor air pollution from the combustion of solid fuels has been implicated, with varying degrees of evidence, as a causal agent of of disease and mortality in developing countries. We review the current knowledge on the relationship between indoor air pollution and disease, and on the assessment of interventions for reducing exposure and disease. Our review takes an environmental health perspective and considers the details of both exposure and health effects that are needed for successful intervention strategies. We also identify knowledge gaps and detailed research questions that are essential for successful design and dissemination of preventive measures and policies. In addition to specific research recommendations, we conclude that given the central role of housing, household energy, and day-to-day household activities in determining exposure to indoor smoke, research and development of effective interventions can benefit tremendously from integration of methods and analysis tools from a range of disciplines—from quantitative environmental science and engineering, to toxicology and epidemiology, to the social sciences.

Suggested Citation

  • Ezzati, Majid & Kammen, Daniel, 2002. "The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in Developing Countries: Knowledge, Gaps, and Data Needs," Discussion Papers dp-02-24, Resources For the Future.
  • Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-02-24
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    File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/RFF-DP-02-24.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Langbein, Jörg & Peters, Jörg & Vance, Colin, 2017. "Outdoor cooking prevalence in developing countries and its implication for clean cooking policies," Ruhr Economic Papers 680, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Bielecki, Christopher & Wingenbach, Gary, 2014. "Rethinking improved cookstove diffusion programs: A case study of social perceptions and cooking choices in rural Guatemala," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 350-358.
    3. repec:eee:rensus:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:1380-1391 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Pachauri, Shonali & Spreng, Daniel, 2011. "Measuring and monitoring energy poverty," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 7497-7504.
    5. Oparinde, Adewale, 2010. "Investigating the relationship between income, health and biomass consumption: a panel data analysis," MPRA Paper 39305, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. E. Somanathan, 2010. "Effects of Information on Environmental Quality in Developing Countries," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 275-292.
    7. Arora, Pooja & Jain, Suresh, 2016. "A review of chronological development in cookstove assessment methods: Challenges and way forward," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 203-220.
    8. repec:eee:energy:v:135:y:2017:i:c:p:767-776 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ian H. Rowlands, 2011. "Co-impacts of energy-related climate change mitigation in Africa�s least developed countries: the evidence base and research needs," GRI Working Papers 39, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    10. Rowlands, Ian, 2011. "Co-impacts of energy-related climate change mitigation in Africa’s least developed countries: the evidence base and research needs," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37575, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    11. Seema Jayachandran, 2009. "Air Quality and Early-Life Mortality: Evidence from Indonesia’s Wildfires," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
    12. Jin, Yinlong & Ma, Xiao & Chen, Xining & Cheng, Yibin & Baris, Enis & Ezzati, Majid, 2006. "Exposure to indoor air pollution from household energy use in rural China: The interactions of technology, behavior, and knowledge in health risk management," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(12), pages 3161-3176, June.
    13. Duncan Chaplin & Arif Mamun & Ali Protik & John Schurrer & Divya Vohra & Kristine Bos & Hannah Burak & Laura Meyer & Anca Dumitrescu & Christopher Ksoll & Thomas Cook, "undated". "Grid Electricity Expansion in Tanzania by MCC: Findings from a Rigorous Impact Evaluation, Final Report," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 144768f69008442e96369195e, Mathematica Policy Research.
    14. repec:spr:bioerq:v:2:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s41247-017-0029-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Mark M. Pitt & Mark R. Rosenzweig & Md. Nazmul Hassan, 2005. "Sharing the Burden of Disease: Gender, the Household Division of Labor and the Health Effects of Indoor Air Pollution," CID Working Papers 119, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    16. Parikh, Jyoti, 2011. "Hardships and health impacts on women due to traditional cooking fuels: A case study of Himachal Pradesh, India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 7587-7594.
    17. Langbein, Jörg, 2017. "Firewood, smoke and respiratory diseases in developing countries: The neglected role of outdoor cooking," Ruhr Economic Papers 697, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    18. Ian Rowlands, 2011. "Ancillary impacts of energy-related climate change mitigation options in Africa’s least developed countries," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 16(7), pages 749-773, October.
    19. Stephan Klasen & Rahul Lahoti, 2016. "How Serious is the Neglect of Intra-Household Inequality in Multi-dimensional Poverty Indices?," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 200, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    20. repec:eee:enepol:v:107:y:2017:i:c:p:507-523 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. repec:eee:socmed:v:183:y:2017:i:c:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Mirzabaev, Alisher & Guta, Dawit & Goedecke, Jann & Gaur, Varun & Börner, Jan & Virchow, Detlef & Denich, Manfred & von Braun, Joachim, 2014. "Bioenergy, Food Security and Poverty Reduction: Mitigating tradeoffs and promoting synergies along the Water- Energy-Food Security Nexus," Working Papers 180421, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    23. Grogan, Louise & Sadanand, Asha, 2013. "Rural Electrification and Employment in Poor Countries: Evidence from Nicaragua," World Development, Elsevier, pages 252-265.
    24. Seema Jayachandran, 2005. "Air Quality and Infant Mortality During Indonesia's Massive Wildfires in 1997," UCLA Economics Online Papers 358, UCLA Department of Economics.
    25. Gao, Xiang & Yu, Qi & Chen, Limin, 2007. "Health effects engineering: Perspectives for environmental health and environmental engineering studies--domestic biomass combustion as an example," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 1433-1438, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household Energy; Developing Countries; Exposure Assessment; Exposure-Response Relationship; Indoor Air Pollution; Intervention; Public Health.;

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