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Distributional Effects of Monetary Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Veronika Selezneva

    (Northwestern University)

  • Martin Schneider

    (Stanford University)

  • Matthias Doepke

    (Northwestern University)

Abstract

We assess the distributional consequences of monetary policy in the current economic environment in the United States. Through its effect on inflation, monetary policy affects the real value of nominal assets and liabilities, and therefore redistributes wealth between borrowers and lenders in the economy. In addition, unconventional policies such as 'quantitative easing' affect real interest rates and the availability of credit, once again leading to redistributional effects. We first document the potential exposure to redistribution effects on the U.S. economy using recent data from the Flow of Funds accounts and the Survey of Consumer Finance. We then quantify the redistribution effects of monetary policy using a rich life-cycle model with idiosyncratic risk, financial constraints, a housing sector, and nominal borrowing and lending. We also discuss the extent to which the recent financial crisis, which has lowered net worth of many households and tightened financial constraints, has changed the nature of distributional consequences of monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Veronika Selezneva & Martin Schneider & Matthias Doepke, 2015. "Distributional Effects of Monetary Policy," 2015 Meeting Papers 1099, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:1099
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adrien Auclert, 2019. "Monetary Policy and the Redistribution Channel," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 109(6), pages 2333-2367, June.
    2. Matthias Doepke & Martin Schneider, 2006. "Aggregate Implications of Wealth Redistribution: The Case of Inflation," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(2-3), pages 493-502, 04-05.
    3. Mr. Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Mr. Lorenz Kueng & Mr. John Silvia & Mr. Olivier Coibion, 2012. "Innocent Bystanders? Monetary Policy and Inequality in the U.S," IMF Working Papers 2012/199, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gianni La Cava & Calvin He, 2021. "The Distributional Effects of Monetary Policy: Evidence from Local Housing Markets in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 54(3), pages 387-397, September.
    2. Areosa, Waldyr Dutra & Areosa, Marta B.M., 2016. "The inequality channel of monetary transmission," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 214-230.
    3. Sheedy, Kevin D., 2017. "Conventional and unconventional monetary policy rules," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 54(PA), pages 127-147.
    4. Carlos Garriga & Finn E. Kydland & Roman Šustek, 2016. "Nominal Rigidities in Debt and Product Markets," Working Papers 801, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    5. Fergus Cumming, 2019. "Mortgage Cash-flows and Employment," Discussion Papers 1922, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
    6. Prasad, Eswar & Zhang, Boyang, 2015. "Distributional Effects of Monetary Policy in Emerging Market Economies," IZA Discussion Papers 9272, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Masayuki Inui & Nao Sudo & Tomoaki Yamada, 2017. "The effects of monetary policy shocks on inequality in Japan," BIS Working Papers 642, Bank for International Settlements.
    8. Ayako Saiki & Jon Frost, 2018. "Japan's Unconventional Monetary Policy and Income Distribution: Revisited," Working Papers e126, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    9. Davtyan, Karen, 2017. "The distributive effect of monetary policy: The top one percent makes the difference," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 106-118.
    10. Casiraghi, Marco & Gaiotti, Eugenio & Rodano, Lisa & Secchi, Alessandro, 2018. "A “reverse Robin Hood”? The distributional implications of non-standard monetary policy for Italian households," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 215-235.
    11. Luetticke, Ralph, 2020. "Comment on “The Household Channel of Monetary Policy in the Euro Area: A Back of the Envelope Calculation”," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 115(C).
    12. Berisha, Edmond & Meszaros, John & Olson, Eric, 2018. "Income inequality, equities, household debt, and interest rates: Evidence from a century of data," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 1-14.
    13. Fleck, Johannes & Monninger, Adrian, 2020. "Culture and portfolios: trust, precautionary savings and home ownership," Working Paper Series 2457, European Central Bank.
    14. Guerello, Chiara, 2018. "Conventional and unconventional monetary policy vs. households income distribution: An empirical analysis for the Euro Area," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 187-214.
    15. Joanna Tyrowicz & Krzysztof Makarski & Marcin Bielecki, 2016. "Reforming retirement age in DB and DC pension systems in an aging OLG economy with heterogenous agents," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-36, December.
    16. Kim, Seongeun, 2019. "Quality, price stickiness, and monetary policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-1.

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