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Propagation in a Model of Goods, Labor and Financial Market Frictions

Listed author(s):
  • Etienne Wasmer

    (Sciences Po, Paris)

  • Nicolas Petrosky-Nadeau

    (Carnegie Mellon University)

Investigating mechanisms of propagation has been central to the business cycle research agenda since its inception. Recent search models of the labor market fail in generating both the size and the persistence of their of central variables to productivity shocks, as does the RBC model in the case of output. Building a model with three imperfect markets - goods, labor and credit -, we find that goods market frictions drastically change the qualitative and quantitative dynamics of labor market variables, leading to significant improvements in bridging the gap with the data both in terms of persistence and volatility. Two factors affecting the expected path of the value to hiring a worker generate persistence: first, the expected dynamics of congestion on goods market, which depends on consumers' search for goods and the entry of new products; and second, the expected dynamics of prices, which alter future profit flows. In the absence of these frictions, there is no persistence in the growth rates, and little amplification, of labor market variables.

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File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2011/paper_119.pdf
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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2011 Meeting Papers with number 119.

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Date of creation: 2011
Handle: RePEc:red:sed011:119
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/
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