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The Sticky Information Phillips Curve: Evidence for Australia

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  • Christian Gillitzer

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

Abstract

The Sticky Information Phillips Curve (SIPC) provides a theoretically appealing alternative to the sticky-price New-Keynesian Phillips curve (NKPC). This paper assesses the empirical performance of the SIPC for Australia. There is only weak evidence in favour of the SIPC over the low-inflation period. Parameter estimates are sensitive to inflation measures and sample periods, and are theoretically inconsistent for several specifications. The apparent poor performance of the SIPC in part reflects the fact that inflation has become difficult to model since the introduction of inflation targeting. Over sample periods including the early 1990s disinflation, the SIPC appears to fit the data better.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Gillitzer, 2015. "The Sticky Information Phillips Curve: Evidence for Australia," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2015-04, Reserve Bank of Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:rba:rbardp:rdp2015-04
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    File URL: https://www.rba.gov.au/publications/rdp/2015/pdf/rdp2015-04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Korenok, Oleg, 2008. "Empirical comparison of sticky price and sticky information models," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 906-927, September.
    2. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2012. "What Can Survey Forecasts Tell Us about Information Rigidities?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 120(1), pages 116-159.
    3. Michael T. Kiley, 2007. "A Quantitative Comparison of Sticky-Price and Sticky-Information Models of Price Setting," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(s1), pages 101-125, February.
    4. N. Gregory Mankiw & Ricardo Reis, 2002. "Sticky Information versus Sticky Prices: A Proposal to Replace the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1295-1328.
    5. Sophocles Mavroeidis & Mikkel Plagborg-Møller & James H. Stock, 2014. "Empirical Evidence on Inflation Expectations in the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 124-188, March.
    6. Khan, Hashmat & Zhu, Zhenhua, 2006. "Estimates of the Sticky-Information Phillips Curve for the United States," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 195-207, February.
    7. Peter Tulip & Stephanie Wallace, 2012. "Estimates of Uncertainty around the RBA's Forecasts," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2012-07, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    8. Jörg Döpke & Jonas Dovern & Ulrich Fritsche & Jiri Slacalek, 2008. "Sticky Information Phillips Curves: European Evidence," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(7), pages 1513-1520, October.
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    1. repec:mbr:jmonec:v:10:y:2015:i:1:p:1-23 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    sticky information; Phillips curve; inflation; Australia;

    JEL classification:

    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation

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