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China’s business cycles since 1979: a chronology and comparative analysis

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Abstract

The path to emerging as the world’s second largest economy (in PPP terms) has not been a smooth one. This paper seeks to provide a detailed chronology of China’s business cycles since 1979. It also considers whether their volatility has changed over time, and how their volatility compares with those in the world’s largest and third largest economies, the U.S and Japan. In the process, several puzzles relating to China’s business cycles are observed that warrant further research attention.

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  • James Laurenceson & Corrine Dobson, "undated". "China’s business cycles since 1979: a chronology and comparative analysis," EAERG Discussion Paper Series 1705, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uqeaer:17
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    File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/economics/eaerg/dp/EAERG_DP17.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. R. Becker & Y. Wang, 2013. "Measuring the Chinese business cycle," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(28), pages 3988-4003, October.

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