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Globalisation and Conflicts: A Theoretical Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Bonginkosi Mamba

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

  • André C Jordaan

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

  • Matthew Clance

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

Abstract

This paper is aimed at providing insights into the interplay between globalisation and conflicts through a theoretical literature review. The motivation is drawn from a large number of debates advocating globalisation as being a double edged sword. The main argument is drawn from the Liberal premise that globalization, through integration and economic interdependence dampens the likelihood of conflicts, whilst the opposite holds for Structuralist theorists. The key highlight from the study is that, different factors exist in determining the relationship between globalisation and conflicts hence furthering the study by means of conducting an evidence based research design is essential in interrogating and extending the current discourse.

Suggested Citation

  • Bonginkosi Mamba & André C Jordaan & Matthew Clance, 2015. "Globalisation and Conflicts: A Theoretical Approach," Working Papers 201555, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:201555
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2002. "Winners and Losers Over Two Centuries of Globalization," NBER Working Papers 9161, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Charles H. Anderton & John R. Carter, 2001. "The Impact of War on Trade: An Interrupted Times-Series Study," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 38(4), pages 445-457, July.
    3. Paul Collier & Anke Hoeffler, 2002. "Greed and Grievance in Civil War," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2002-01, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    4. Jong-Wha Lee & Ju Hyun Pyun, 2016. "Does Trade Integration Contribute to Peace?," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(1), pages 327-344, February.
    5. Reuven Glick & Alan M. Taylor, 2010. "Collateral Damage: Trade Disruption and the Economic Impact of War," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(1), pages 102-127, February.
    6. Acemoglu,Daron & Robinson,James A., 2009. "Economic Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521671422.
    7. Robert J. Barro, 2006. "Rare Disasters and Asset Markets in the Twentieth Century," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(3), pages 823-866.
    8. Katherine Barbieri & Gerald Schneider, 1999. "Globalization and Peace: Assessing New Directions in the Study of Trade and Conflict," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 36(4), pages 387-404, July.
    9. S. Brock Blomberg & Gregory D. Hess, 2006. "How Much Does Violence Tax Trade?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 599-612, November.
    10. Hillebrand Evan E, 2010. "Deglobalization Scenarios: Who Wins? Who Loses?," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 10(2), pages 1-21, May.
    11. World Bank, 2012. "De-fragmenting Africa : Deepening Regional Trade Integration in Goods and Services
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      ," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12385, The World Bank.
    12. Havard Hegre, 2000. "Development and the Liberal Peace: What Does it Take to be a Trading State?," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 37(1), pages 5-30, January.
    13. Greif, Avner & Milgrom, Paul & Weingast, Barry R, 1994. "Coordination, Commitment, and Enforcement: The Case of the Merchant Guild," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(4), pages 745-776, August.
    14. Reuven Glick & Alan M. Taylor, 2010. "Collateral Damage: Trade Disruption and the Economic Impact of War," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(1), pages 102-127, February.
    15. Emilie M. Hafner-Burton & Alexander H. Montgomery, 2012. "War, Trade, and Distrust: Why Trade Agreements Don’t Always Keep the Peace," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 29(3), pages 257-278, July.
    16. Katherine Barbieri & Jack S. Levy, 1999. "Sleeping with the Enemy: The Impact of War on Trade," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 36(4), pages 463-479, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalisation and Conflicts; Dyads Integration; Trade Agreements; Inter-State Wars; Intra-State Wars;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F18 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Environment
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations

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