IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pre/wpaper/200801.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The General Equilibrium Effects of a Productivity Increase on the Economy and Gender in South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Godbertha Kinyondo

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

  • Margaret Mabugu

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

Abstract

This study utilises a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model to examine the effects of economy-wide (SIM 1) and partial (SIM 2) productivity increases on the economy, gender employment, wages, income and welfare in South Africa. The model has 49 sectors, 14 household categories, and 2 primary inputs. SIM 1 results in ‘output’ led employment demand and increased earnings for all skill types of men and women. Skilled men benefits more than others in most sectors. Under SIM 2, productivity has negative employment impact of all skills mostly in labour-intensive sectors. Some displaced labour relocates to expanded export-orientation and service sectors resulting in increased economy-wide jobs and earnings. Unskilled women earnings, however, decline because they are concentrated in low-paying positions. In addition, productivity improves household’s welfare due to reduced commodity prices and improved earnings.

Suggested Citation

  • Godbertha Kinyondo & Margaret Mabugu, 2008. "The General Equilibrium Effects of a Productivity Increase on the Economy and Gender in South Africa," Working Papers 200801, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:200801
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.up.ac.za/media/shared/61/WP/wp_2008_01.zp39500.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Shujiro Urata & Hiroki Kawai, 2000. "Intrafirm Technology Transfer by Japanese Manufacturing Firms in Asia," NBER Chapters,in: The Role of Foreign Direct Investment in East Asian Economic Development, NBER-EASE Volume 9, pages 49-77 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Diao, Xinshen & Rattso, Jorn & Stokke, Hildegunn Ekroll, 2005. "International spillovers, productivity growth and openness in Thailand: an intertemporal general equilibrium analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 429-450, April.
    3. Johann Kirsten & Julian May & Sheryl Hendriks & Charles L. Machethe & Cecelia Punt & Mike Lyne, 2007. "South Africa," Chapters,in: Beyond Food Production, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
      • Nick Vink & Gavin Williams & Johann Kirsten, 2004. "South Africa," Chapters,in: The World's Wine Markets, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Diao, Xinshen & Rattsø, Jørn & Stokke, Hildegunn Ekroll, 2002. "International spillovers, productivity growth and openness in Thailand," TMD discussion papers 89, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Channing Arndt & Finn Tarp, 2008. "Trade Policy Reform and the Missing Revenue †," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 17(1), pages 131-160, January.
    6. Arndt, Channing & Tarp, Finn, 2003. "Trade Policy Reform and the Missing Revenue: A Gendered Analysis for Mozambique," MPRA Paper 62441, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Klein, Michael & Aaron, Carl & Hadjimichael, Bita, 2001. "Foreign direct investment and poverty reduction," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2613, The World Bank.
    8. L Edwards, 2001. "Globalisation And The Skills Bias Of Occupational Employment In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 69(1), pages 40-71, March.
    9. Yih-Chyi Chuang & Chi-Mei Lin, 1999. "Foreign direct investment, R&D and spillover efficiency: Evidence from Taiwan's manufacturing firms," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 117-137.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CGE; FDI; South Africa; Gender; Productivity;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:200801. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Rangan Gupta). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/decupza.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.