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The macroeconomic, industrial and distributional effects of removing tariffs in Bangladesh

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  • Hoque, Serajul

Abstract

This paper examines the economic effects of removing tariffs in Bangladesh using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelling approach. The results of the simulations indicate that in the short-run a funded tariff cut with fixed real national savings would increase employment slightly and hence would expand GDP. There would be a small economy-wide welfare gain as measured by real consumption. The sectoral results showed that export-oriented industries would experience an expansion in output and employment. There also would be positive effects on the suppliers to these industries. Lightly-protected industries, which rely heavily on imported intermediate inputs, are projected to show robust expansion as they would benefit from a cost reduction. However, highly-protected, import-competing industries would suffer a contraction in output and employment as they would face increased competition from imports due to the removal of tariffs. The simulation results also indicate that there would have some noticeable effects on the distribution of real consumption between different household groups. Overall, urban households would experience an expansion in real consumption and rural households would suffer a contraction as a consequence of the funded tariff cut with fixed real national savings.

Suggested Citation

  • Hoque, Serajul, 2008. "The macroeconomic, industrial and distributional effects of removing tariffs in Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 9577, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:9577
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/9577/1/MPRA_paper_9577.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer & Marinos E. Tsigas, 2004. "Macro, industry and state effects in the U.S. of removing major tariffs and quotas," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-146, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    2. Nabil Annabi & H. Khondker Bazlul & Selim Raihan & John Cockburn & Bernard Decaluwe, 2005. "Implications of WTO Agreements and Domestic Trade Policy Reforms for Poverty in Bangladesh: Short vs. Long Run," Working Papers MPIA 2005-02, PEP-MPIA.
    3. Decaluwe, Bernard & Martens, Andre, 1988. "CGE modeling and developing economies: A concise empirical survey of 73 applications to 26 countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 529-568.
    4. Fontana, Marzia & Wobst, Peter & Dorosh, Paul A., 2001. "Macro policies and the food sector in Bangladesh," TMD discussion papers 73, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Bandara, Jayatilleke S, 1991. " Computable General Equilibrium Models for Development Policy Analysis in LDCs," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(1), pages 3-69.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sayeed, Yeasmin, 2014. "Trade-offs in Achieving Human Development Goals for Bangladesh," Working Papers 2014:6, Örebro University, School of Business.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CGE model; trade liberalisation; income distribution; Bangladesh;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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