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Le Coût Economique du paludisme au Sénégal
[The Economic Cost of Malaria in Senegal]

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  • Thiongane, Mamaye

Abstract

Malaria constitutes, beyond a public health problem, a major challenge for the development of endemic countries. The objective of this study is to estimate the economic cost of malaria in Senegal. A logarithmic double model with interaction effect is used and estimated, using a time series data from 1995 to 2013, by MCO method. At the macroeconomic level, when malaria morbidity increases by 1%, GDP per capita falls by 0.000346. Applied to average total GDP over the study period, this corresponds to an average annual loss of US $ 2.9 million (XOF 1.2 billion per year). In addition, the study shows a decrease of the labor factor impact when taking into account the interaction effect of malaria. In fact, in the case of a 1% increase in malaria, the contribution resulting from a 1% increase in the labor force decreases by 0.48 point. Such consequences due to malaria can lead in the long run to adverse effects on economic growth and on efforts to fight poverty in Senegal.

Suggested Citation

  • Thiongane, Mamaye, 2015. "Le Coût Economique du paludisme au Sénégal [The Economic Cost of Malaria in Senegal]," MPRA Paper 89063, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:89063
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Cost; Malaria; Logarithmic Double Model; Interaction Effect;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development

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