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The US Opidemic: Prescription Opioids, Labour Market Conditions and Crime

Author

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  • Deiana, Claudio
  • Giua, Ludovica

Abstract

In response to the recent opioid crisis, US states have implemented several policies to reduce the dispensing of opioids and contain drug mortality. We analyse the effectiveness of these laws and their unintended fallouts on labour participation and crime at the local level. Using multiple data sources and a difference-in-difference set-up, we show that the laws targeting the supply for opioids yield larger reductions in prescribed drugs compared to the demand-side policies, particularly in the absence of cross-bordering effects. We observe an improvement in labour market participation and higher crime rates following the enforcement of some of the policies considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Deiana, Claudio & Giua, Ludovica, 2018. "The US Opidemic: Prescription Opioids, Labour Market Conditions and Crime," MPRA Paper 85712, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:85712
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/85712/1/MPRA_paper_85712.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Abby Alpert & David Powell & Rosalie Liccardo Pacula, 2018. "Supply-Side Drug Policy in the Presence of Substitutes: Evidence from the Introduction of Abuse-Deterrent Opioids," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 1-35, November.
    2. Carpenter, Christopher S. & McClellan, Chandler B. & Rees, Daniel I., 2017. "Economic conditions, illicit drug use, and substance use disorders in the United States," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 63-73.
    3. Dhaval Dave & Monica Deza & Brady P. Horn, 2018. "Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, Opioid Abuse, and Crime," NBER Working Papers 24975, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    5. William N. Evans & Ethan M. J. Lieber & Patrick Power, 2019. "How the Reformulation of OxyContin Ignited the Heroin Epidemic," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 101(1), pages 1-15, March.
    6. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Colleen Carey, 2018. "The Effect of Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs on Opioid Utilization in Medicare," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 77-112, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Aliprantis, Dionissi & Schweitzer, Mark E., 2018. "Opioids and the Labor Market," Working Papers (Old Series) 1807, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    2. Strulik, Holger, 2019. "Opioid epidemics," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 371, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Claudio Deiana & Ludovica Giua & Roberto Nisticò, 2019. "The Economics Behind the Epidemic: Afghan Opium Price and Prescription Opioids in the US," CSEF Working Papers 525, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 13 May 2019.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Prescription Opioids; Drugs; Labour Market; Crime.;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • K14 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - Criminal Law

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