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To what extent does income predict an individual’s risk profile in the UK (2012- 2014)


  • Wright, Joshua


This study seeks to estimate whether income is predictive of an individual’s risk profile. The consensus amongst the existing literature is that income is predictive of an individual’s risk profile and the two do have a relationship. This study uses a quantitative approach by estimating a series of statistical models that estimate the relationship between an individual’s income and their risk profile using a large UK based longitudinal dataset. The research finds that income is positively related to risk and that for every £1,000 increase in income, an individual’s odds of becoming risk seeking increase by 1%. Moreover, the research finds that not only is income predictive of an individual’s risk, but so too are;; gender, education level, age and self-employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Wright, Joshua, 2017. "To what extent does income predict an individual’s risk profile in the UK (2012- 2014)," MPRA Paper 80757, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:80757

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Yesuf, Mahmud & Bluffstone, Randy, 2007. "Risk aversion in low income countries: Experimental evidence from Ethiopia," IFPRI discussion papers 715, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    6. Donkers, Bas & Melenberg, Bertrand & Van Soest, Arthur, 2001. "Estimating Risk Attitudes Using Lotteries: A Large Sample Approach," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 165-195, March.
    7. Schooley, Diane K. & Worden, Debra Drecnik, 1996. "Risk aversion measures: comparing attitudes and asset allocation," Financial Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 87-99.
    8. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    9. Flachaire, Emmanuel & Hollard, Guillaume, 2008. "Individual sensitivity to framing effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 296-307, July.
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    11. Robert B. Barsky & F. Thomas Juster & Miles S. Kimball & Matthew D. Shapiro, 1997. "Preference Parameters and Behavioral Heterogeneity: An Experimental Approach in the Health and Retirement Study," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 537-579.
    12. Bellante, Don & Green, Carole A., 2004. "Relative risk aversion among the elderly," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 269-281.
    13. Botti Fabrizio & Conte Anna & Di Cagno Daniela Teresa & D'Ippoliti Carlo, 2008. "Risk Attitude in Real Decision Problems," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-32, March.
    14. Cook, William & Whittle, Richard, 2015. "Do individuals’ risk and time preferences predict entrepreneurial choice?," MPRA Paper 66674, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Kachelmeier, Steven J & Shehata, Mohamed, 1992. "Examining Risk Preferences under High Monetary Incentives: Experimental Evidence from the People's Republic of China," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1120-1141, December.
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    More about this item


    Individuals; Risk Profiles; Income; UK.;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty

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