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Rethinking the current inflation target range in South Africa

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  • Bonga-Bonga, Lumengo
  • Lebese, Ntsakeseni Letitia

Abstract

With critics suggesting that inflation targeting is not an appropriate monetary policy framework for developing and emerging countries, this paper assesses whether or not the 3%-6% inflation target is the optimal inflation target band in South Africa. The optimal inflation target band is determined based on the time-varying non-accelerating inflation rate of unemployment (the NAIRU). The estimation results provide an estimated inflation range that is wider than the current range pursued by the South African Reserve Bank. This may suggest that the current range of inflation hinders real activities, especially employment in South Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Bonga-Bonga, Lumengo & Lebese, Ntsakeseni Letitia, 2016. "Rethinking the current inflation target range in South Africa," MPRA Paper 73912, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:73912
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    inflation target; NAIRU; unemployment; South Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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