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Indecisiveness, Undesirability and Overload Revealed Through Rational Choice Deferral

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  • Gerasimou, Georgios

Abstract

Three reasons why decision makers may defer choice are *indecisiveness* between feasible options, *unattractiveness* of these options and *choice overload*. This paper provides a choice-theoretic explanation for each of these phenomena by means of three deferral-permissive models of decision making that are driven by preference incompleteness, undesirability and complexity constraints, respectively. These models feature *rational* choice deferral in the sense that whenever the individual does choose an option from a menu, this is a most preferred option in that menu, so that choices are always WARP-consistent. The models also allow for the use of observable data to recover the individual's preferences and, where applicable, the indecisiveness and undesirability components of these preferences.

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  • Gerasimou, Georgios, 2015. "Indecisiveness, Undesirability and Overload Revealed Through Rational Choice Deferral," MPRA Paper 67290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:67290
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gerasimou, Georgios & Papi, Mauro, 2015. "Oligopolistic Competition with Choice-Overloaded Consumers," MPRA Paper 68509, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Buturak, Gökhan & Evren, Özgür, 2017. "Choice overload and asymmetric regret," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 12(3), September.
    3. Elias Bouacida, 2019. "Eliciting Choice Correspondences A General Method and an Experimental Implementation," PSE Working Papers halshs-01998001, HAL.
    4. Horan, Sean, 2019. "Random consideration and choice: A case study of “default” options," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 73-84.
    5. Kovach, Matthew & Ülkü, Levent, 2020. "Satisficing with a variable threshold," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 67-76.
    6. Elias Bouacida, 2019. "Eliciting Choice Correspondences A General Method and an Experimental Implementation," Working Papers halshs-01998001, HAL.
    7. Chowdhury, Shyamal & Smits, Joeri & Sun, Qigang, 2020. "Contract Structure, Time Preference, and Technology Adoption," IZA Discussion Papers 13590, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Chowdhury, Shyamal & Smits, Joeri & Sun, Qigang, 2020. "Contract structure, time preference, and technology adoption," GLO Discussion Paper Series 633, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    9. Juan P. Aguilera & Levent Ülkü, 2017. "On the maximization of menu-dependent interval orders," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 48(2), pages 357-366, February.
    10. Gerasimou, Georgios & Papi, Mauro, 2018. "Duopolistic competition with choice-overloaded consumers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 330-353.
    11. Uyanık, Metin & Khan, M. Ali, 2019. "On the consistency and the decisiveness of the double-minded decision-maker," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 185(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Choice deferral; incomplete preferences; indecisiveness; unattractiveness; choice overload; revealed preference.;

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory

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