IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/pra/mprapa/65840.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Islamic banking: 40 years later, still interest-based? Evidence from Malaysia

Author

Listed:
  • Gulzar, Rosana
  • Masih, Mansur

Abstract

As Islamic banking comes of age 40 years after its beginning, scholars and academics are calling for a better version 2. Regulators in Malaysia and Pakistan are pushing the industry to adopt more Islamic contracts which live up to the spirits of Shariah. Malaysia, specifically, has launched the Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 (IFSA) as a step in this direction. To facilitate the transition, this study has two objectives; to test whether conventional rates is still cointegrated with Islamic banks’ profit rates in Malaysia and a ranking of the exogeneity of the factors that affect the profit rates. It uses a range of multivariate time series techniques namely the cointegration test, vector error correction model (VECM), cumulative sum (CUSUM) and cumulative sum of squares (CUSUMSQ) tests, variance decomposition (VDC), impulse response and persistence profiles. This study contributes to the literature through its use of the latest data (up to December 2014) and its rank of less-tested variables such as the ratio of Islamic deposits to total Islamic assets. The VDC ranking can also serve as a basis for comparison for the effects of IFSA. This research finds that Islamic profit rates are still cointegrated withconventional rates such as the overnight policy rate (OPR) and fixed deposit rates. Additionally, it is also led by Islamic banks’ dependency on deposits for funding and their market shares. These findings may give urgency to policy makers and practitioners to evolutionise current Islamic banking practices towards what is likely to be a more stable financial system.

Suggested Citation

  • Gulzar, Rosana & Masih, Mansur, 2015. "Islamic banking: 40 years later, still interest-based? Evidence from Malaysia," MPRA Paper 65840, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:65840
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/65840/1/MPRA_paper_65840.pdf
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Serhan Cevik & Joshua Charap, 2015. "The Behavior of Conventional and Islamic Bank Deposit Returns in Malaysia and Turkey," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 111-124.
    2. Chong, Beng Soon & Liu, Ming-Hua, 2009. "Islamic banking: Interest-free or interest-based?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 125-144, January.
    3. Azmat, Saad & Skully, Michael & Brown, Kym, 2015. "Can Islamic banking ever become Islamic?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 253-272.
    4. Beck, Thorsten & Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli & Merrouche, Ouarda, 2013. "Islamic vs. conventional banking: Business model, efficiency and stability," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 433-447.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Mohamad Husam Helmi, 2016. "Islamic Banking, Credit and Economic Growth: Some Empirical Evidence," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1541, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Hasan, Zubair, 2016. "Risk-sharing the sole basis of Islamic finance? time for a serious rethink," MPRA Paper 72252, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 Apr 2018.
    3. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Abdurrahman Nazif Catik & Mohamad Husam Helmi & Faek Menla Ali & Mohammad Tajik, 2016. "The Bank Lending Channel in a Dual Banking System: Evidence from Malaysia," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1557, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Profit rates; investment account rates; interest rates; OPR; IFSA; Time Series;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C58 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Financial Econometrics
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:65840. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/vfmunde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.