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Globalization, national innovation systems and response of public policy

  • Singh, Lakhwinder

Abstract This paper attempts to set the significance of public innovation policies in contemporary developing countries in the context of the fast pace of globalization. It is fairly well established both in theory and practice that investment expenditure on innovation projects is likely to be low if left in the hands of private economic agents as they have a tendency to under-invest due to the ‘public good’ nature of the outcomes of R&D. However, policy in developing economies seldom takes seriously the importance of investment in innovation projects. This has not been without far-reaching implications for the growth and development performance of developing countries in general. The paper explores the role of international institutions and national governments in the task of strengthening national innovation systems through innovative interventions at national and international levels.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/641/1/MPRA_paper_641.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 641.

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Date of creation: 01 Nov 2006
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Publication status: Published in International Journal of Technology Management and sustainable Development Issue 3.Vol. 3(2004): pp. 215-231
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:641
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  1. Andreas Savvides & Marios Zachariadis, 2005. "International Technology Diffusion and the Growth of TFP in the Manufacturing Sector of Developing Economies," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 482-501, November.
  2. Shahid Yusuf, 2003. "Innovative East Asia : The Future of Growth," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15158, December.
  3. Coe, D.T. & Helpman, E., 1993. "International R&D Spillovers," Papers 5-93, Tel Aviv.
  4. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-51, March.
  5. David L. Carr & James R. Markusen & Keith E. Maskus, 1998. "Estimating the Knowledge-Capital Model of the Multinational Enterprise," NBER Working Papers 6773, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Chris Papageorgiou & Andreas Savvides & Marios Zachariadis, 2006. "International Medical Technology Diffsion," 2006 Meeting Papers 23, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Narula Rajneesh & Sadowski Bert M., 1998. "Technological catch-up and strategic technology partnering in developing countries," Research Memorandum 001, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  8. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-37, October.
  9. Jan Fagerberg & Bart Verspagen, 2001. "Technology-Gaps, Innovation-Diffusion And Transformation: An Evolutionary Interpretation," Working Papers 11, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  10. Guifang Yang & Maskus, Keith E., 2003. "Intellectual property rights, licensing, and innovation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2973, The World Bank.
  11. Xu, Bin, 2000. "Multinational enterprises, technology diffusion, and host country productivity growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 477-493, August.
  12. Jan Fagerberg, 1987. "A technology gap approach to why growth rates differ," Working Papers Archives 1987002, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  13. Mani, Sunil, 1999. "Public Innovation Policies and Developing Countries In a Phase of Economic Liberalisation," UNU-INTECH Discussion Paper Series 02, United Nations University - INTECH.
  14. David T. Coe & Elhanan Helpman & Alexander Hoffmaister, 1995. "North-South R&D Spillovers," NBER Working Papers 5048, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Robert E. Evenson & Lakhwinder Singh, 1997. "Economic Growth, International Technological Spillovers and Public Policy: Theory and Empirical Evidence from Asia," Working Papers 777, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  16. Aitken, Brian & Harrison, Ann & DEC, 1994. "Do domestic firms benefit from foreign direct investment? Evidence from panel data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1248, The World Bank.
  17. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth Through Creative Destruction," Scholarly Articles 12490578, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  18. Evenson, R.E. & Singh, L., 1997. "Economic Growth, International Technological Spillovers and Public Policy: Theory and Empirical Evidence from Asia," Papers 777, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
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  1. Socio-Economics of Innovation

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