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Demographic Transition and Rise of Modern Representative Democracy

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  • Namasaka, Martin

Abstract

By focusing solely on the institutional reforms and changes in the political leadership that precede political liberalisation, studies on the determinants of democracy have often overlooked the influence of demographic factors such as population age structure as a catalyst for and reflection of a host of changes in societies that can affect governance and stability of liberal democracy. It is not surprising, noting the recent revolutions such as the Arab spring and the Egyptian Uprising , that numerous research now tends to spotlight the so called youth bulge and how they tend to either support authoritarian regimes or sustain liberal democracies as a result of youth-led democracy movements as witnessed in Costa Rica, India, Jamaica and South Africa (Cincotta, R. (2008/09).

Suggested Citation

  • Namasaka, Martin, 2014. "Demographic Transition and Rise of Modern Representative Democracy," MPRA Paper 60122, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:60122
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/60122/1/MPRA_paper_60122.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wolfgang Lutz & Jesús Crespo Cuaresma & Mohammad Jalal Abbasi-Shavazi, 2010. "Demography, Education, and Democracy: Global Trends and the Case of Iran," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(2), pages 253-281.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demographic Transition; Democracy; Population Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa; Perspectives on the Demographic Transition; Youth Bulge; Second and Third Demographic Transition; China and India; Demographic Transition and Economic Growth and Demographic Responses; Fertility Decline and the Demographic Transition; Population and Development; Population and National Security; Demographic Transition and Changing Sex Roles;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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