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Pro-Girl Bias in Intrahousehold Allocation in the Rural Philippines: Revisiting the ‘adult goods’ approach

  • Fuwa, Nobuhiko

This paper detects pro-girl (age 5-15) bias in intrahousehold allocation of consumption budget in the rural Philippines using Deaton’s “adult goods” method. Based on additional checks (including those for endogeneity), the results appear to be robust. The paper also finds that a larger share of girls among household members is positively associated with a larger budget share on transportation, suggesting that parents pay more for girls’ transportation, possibly due to safety concerns. The results also suggest that, despite some earlier results in the literature, the adult goods method is capable of detecting gender bias, although alcohol and tobacco may not be suitable for detecting gender bias.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 53750.

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Date of creation: 17 Feb 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:53750
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  1. Haddad, Lawrence & Kanbur, Ravi, 1990. "How Serious Is the Neglect of Intra-Household Inequality?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(402), pages 866-81, September.
  2. Browning, Martin, 1992. "Children and Household Economic Behavior," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1434-75, September.
  3. Deaton, Angus S, 1989. "Looking for Boy-Girl Discrimination in Household Expenditure Data," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 3(1), pages 1-15, January.
  4. John Gibson & Scott Rozelle, 2004. "Is it Better to be a Boy? A Disaggregated Outlay Equivalent Analysis of Gender Bias in Papua New Guinea," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 115-136.
  5. Nobuhiko FUWA & Seiro ITO & Kensuke KUBO & Takashi KUROSAKI & Yasuyuki SAWADA, 2006. "Gender Discrimination, Intrahousehold Resource Allocation, And Importance Of Spouses' Fathers: Evidence On Household Expenditure From Rural India," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 44(4), pages 398-439.
  6. Ahmad, A. & Morduch, J., 1993. "Identifying Sex Bias in the Allocation of Household Resources: Evidence from Linked Household Surveys from Bangladesh," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1636, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  7. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Estudillo, Jonna P. & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2004. "Land and schooling," Food policy statements 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Strauss, John & Beegle, Kathleen, 1996. "Intrahousehold Allocations: A Review of Theories, Empirical Evidence and Policy Issues," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54688, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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