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Education, race and revealed attitudes towards homosexual couples

Author

Listed:
  • Leguizamon, Sebastian
  • Leguizamon, Susane
  • Christafore, David

Abstract

We examine the varying influence of the presence of homosexual couples on average home prices with different compositions of educational attainment and race. We find that a higher number of homosexuals in relatively higher educated areas is associated with higher average prices and lower average prices in areas with less educated residents. The magnitude of positive influence and negative influence is lower when the number of black residents increases. This suggests that education is associated with a greater revealed tolerance for homosexuals, but the influence of education is less for areas with a higher percent black, perhaps due to homophily.

Suggested Citation

  • Leguizamon, Sebastian & Leguizamon, Susane & Christafore, David, 2013. "Education, race and revealed attitudes towards homosexual couples," MPRA Paper 47068, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:47068
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/47068/1/MPRA_paper_47068.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Myers, Caitlin Knowles, 2004. "Discrimination and neighborhood effects: understanding racial differentials in US housing prices," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 279-302, September.
    2. Martin J. Bailey, 1966. "Effects of Race and of Other Demographic Factors on the Values of Single-Family Homes," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2), pages 215-220.
    3. Christafore, David & Leguizamon, Susane, 2012. "The influence of gay and lesbian coupled households on house prices in conservative and liberal neighborhoods," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 258-267.
    4. David Brasington & Donald R. Haurin, 2006. "Educational Outcomes and House Values: A Test of the value added Approach," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 245-268.
    5. David Bell & Jon Binnie, 2004. "Authenticating Queer Space: Citizenship, Urbanism and Governance," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 41(9), pages 1807-1820, August.
    6. Christafore, David & Leguizamon, J. Sebastian & Leguizamon, Susane, 2013. "Are black neighborhoods less welcoming to homosexuals than white neighborhoods?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 579-589.
    7. Brasington, David M. & Hite, Diane, 2005. "Demand for environmental quality: a spatial hedonic analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 57-82, January.
    8. Sergio Currarini & Matthew O. Jackson & Paolo Pin, 2009. "An Economic Model of Friendship: Homophily, Minorities, and Segregation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(4), pages 1003-1045, July.
    9. repec:cup:apsrev:v:103:y:2009:i:03:p:367-386_99 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Dan Black & Gary Gates & Seth Sanders & Lowell Taylor, 2000. "Demographics of the gay and lesbian population in the United States: Evidence from available systematic data sources," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(2), pages 139-154, May.
    11. Benjamin Golub & Matthew O. Jackson, 2012. "How Homophily Affects the Speed of Learning and Best-Response Dynamics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1287-1338.
    12. Black, Dan & Gates, Gary & Sanders, Seth & Taylor, Lowell, 2002. "Why Do Gay Men Live in San Francisco?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 54-76, January.
    13. Richard Florida & Charlotta Mellander, 2010. "There goes the metro: how and why bohemians, artists and gays affect regional housing values," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(2), pages 167-188, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sexual Orientation; Homophily; Race; Education; Prejudice;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand

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