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Mode of socio-economic development and occupational structure: the case of contemporary Russia

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Abstract

The given paper assumes the existence of a correlation between the occupational structure and the mode of social and economic development of a country. It is shown that the modern stage of development in advanced economies could be described by the post-industrial phase with (a) the specific proportions in the occupational structure (predominance of professional managers and technical experts); (b) particular nature of work and the corresponding extent of labor division according to specialization and qualification (highly skilled labor with broad specialization and a new criterion of creativity included within qualifications). Within the certain historical framework these indicators, combined onto the entire scheme, produce the criteria to distinct different types of socio-economic development and arrange them in consistent order. The analysis of occupational structure of Russian population shows that the reforms of 1990s have facilitated the process of deindustrialization alongside with the growth of semi- and low-skilled jobs. According to the scheme, Russia seems to have reached the stage of the development that is similar to one of the 1950–1960s in the USA and the Europe.

Suggested Citation

  • Anikin, Vasiliy, 2013. "Mode of socio-economic development and occupational structure: the case of contemporary Russia," MPRA Paper 45027, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:45027
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/45027/1/MPRA_paper_45027.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Judit KAPà S & Pál CZEGLÉDI, 2007. "What Does Transition Mean?: Post-socialist and Western European Countries Paralleled," The Journal of Comparative Economic Studies (JCES), The Japanese Society for Comparative Economic Studies (JSCES), vol. 3, pages 3-28, December.
    2. George L. Perry, 1971. "Labor Force Structure, Potential Output, and Productivity," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 2(3), pages 533-578.
    3. Lindert, Peter H., 1980. "English Occupations, 1670–1811," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 40(04), pages 685-712, December.
    4. Oesch, Daniel & Rodriguez Menes, Jorge, 2010. "Upgrading or polarization? Occupational change in Britain, Germany, Spain and Switzerland, 1990-2008," MPRA Paper 21040, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantin Fursov & Thomas Thurner, 2016. "God Helps Those Who Help Themselves! A Study of User-Innovation in Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 59/STI/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    2. Anikin, Vasiliy, 2013. "Motivation to Work in Russia: The Case of Protracted Transition from Noncompetitive to Competitive System," MPRA Paper 45292, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Mar 2013.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Occupational structure; Socio-economic development; Knowledge based economy; Industrialization; Labour potential; Modernization; Russia;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General

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