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Effects of gender on credit card usage among university students in Turkey

  • Çankaya, Serkan
  • Ucal, Meltem
  • O'Neil, Mary

In recent years, much has been written about credit card usage among university students. Despite a vast number of studies, little has been written about credit card usage among university students in developing countries. This research surveyed university students in Turkey in an attempt to understand their uses of credit cards. In particular, we examined the impact of gender on credit card use. The literature on the impact of gender on credit card usage is a bit unsettled and this study seeks to add another dimension to the research in this area. Using both parametric and nonparametric measures, we sought to isolate gender and tested whether or not it affects the ways that young people in Turkey use credit cards. The importance of this research centers on the portrait it provides of credit card usage among young people in a developing country as well as to pointing the factors that may influence future credit card use.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/43657/1/MPRA_paper_43657.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 43657.

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Date of creation: 27 Jul 2011
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Publication status: Published in African Journal of Business Management 22.5(2011): pp. 9023-9030
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:43657
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  1. Ajzen, Icek, 1991. "The theory of planned behavior," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 179-211, December.
  2. Tokunaga, Howard, 1993. "The use and abuse of consumer credit: Application of psychological theory and research," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 285-316, June.
  3. Brad M. Barber & Terrance Odean, 2001. "Boys Will Be Boys: Gender, Overconfidence, And Common Stock Investment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(1), pages 261-292, February.
  4. Hayhoe, Celia Ray & Leach, Lauren & Turner, Pamela R., 1999. "Discriminating the number of credit cards held by college students using credit and money attitudes," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 643-656, December.
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