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Behind the Greek default and restructuring of 2012

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  • Porzecanski, Arturo C.

Abstract

The pedestrian narrative about the Greek financial crisis and default is that the country was fiscally mismanaged for a long time and failed to carry out needed structural reforms that could have improved economic growth prospects and enhanced the country’s creditworthiness. Therefore, a default and debt restructuring were inevitable sooner or later—and certainly so once the financial markets were informed, as happened in October 2009, that prior governments had underestimated their budget deficit and public debt figures. The prosaic tale of the supposed inevitability of the Greek tragedy has been endorsed, for example, by a prominent economic historian: “Since independence in the 1830s, Greece has been in a state of default about 50 percent of the time. Does that tell you something?” In reality, Greece’s road to default and debt restructuring in 2012 was not at all straightforward—and there was no historical inevitability about it, either.

Suggested Citation

  • Porzecanski, Arturo C., 2012. "Behind the Greek default and restructuring of 2012," MPRA Paper 42432, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:42432
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "This Time is Different: A Panoramic View of Eight Centuries of Financial Crises," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 1065-1188, November.
    2. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    3. Arturo C. Porzecanski, 2005. "From Rogue Creditors to Rogue Debtors: Implications of Argentina's Default," International Finance 0510010, EconWPA.
    4. Juan J. Cruces & Christoph Trebesch, 2013. "Sovereign Defaults: The Price of Haircuts," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(3), pages 85-117, July.
    5. Porzecanski, Arturo C., 2010. "When Bad Things Happen to Good Sovereign Debt Contracts: The Case of Ecuador," MPRA Paper 20857, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jeromin Zettelmeyer & Christoph Trebesch & Mitu Gulati, 2013. "The Greek debt restructuring: an autopsy," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 28(75), pages 513-563, July.
    2. Niamh Hardiman & Joaquim Filipe Araújo & Muiris MacCarthaigh & Calliope Spanou, 2017. "The Troika’s variations on a trio: Why the loan programmes worked so differently in Greece, Ireland, and Portugal," Working Papers 201711, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    3. Sebastian Dellepiane & Niamh Hardiman, 2012. "Fiscal Politics In Time: Pathways to Fiscal Consolidation, 1980-2012," Working Papers 201228, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Greece; Europe; debt; default; restructuring; sovereign;

    JEL classification:

    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • G33 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Bankruptcy; Liquidation
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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