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China's monetary sterilization and it's economical relationship with the European Union

  • Gábor, Tamás
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    The author examines China’s monetary policy in the light of the sterilization process of the excess liquidity caused by the permanent foreign exchange rate intervention. The tools of the neutralization of the monetary oversupply, its effectiveness and its costs are also investigated. With the help of Two-stage least squares (2SLS) regression method it is demonstrated that the sterilization process of the yuan has been almost a total success on the level of the monetary base, and has been partially effective on the level of the M2 supply in the past 15 years. With a cost-benefit analysis it is highlighted that the practice of the monetary sterilization – which is thought to be loss-making in the literature – has been a profitable operation of the central bank up to date. After the demonstration of the monetary sterilization, the economic relationship between China and the European Union is investigated. It is pointed out that China’s role as a global importer and a global investor has been significantly appreciated. Thanks to China’s active economic presence in the European market during the crisis, the recession of the European economies were probably much moderate.

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/40362/1/MPRA_paper_40362.pdf
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    Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 40362.

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    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:40362
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    1. Joshua Aizenman & Reuven Glick, 2008. "Sterilization, monetary policy, and global financial integration," Working Paper Series 2008-15, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    2. William R. Cline & John Williamson, 2009. "2009 Estimates of Fundamental Equilibrium Exchange Rates," Policy Briefs PB09-10, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    3. Woochan Kim, 2003. "Does Capital Account Liberalization Discipline Budget Deficit?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(5), pages 830-844, November.
    4. Brissimis, S.N. & Gibson, H.D. & Tsakalotos, E., 1997. "A Unifying Framework for Analysing Offsetting Capital Flows and Sterilisation," Athens University of Economics and Business 97-06, Athens University of Economics and Business, Department of International and European Economic Studies.
    5. Árvai, Zsófia, 1995. "A kötelező tartalékráta szabályozásának átalakulása
      [Changes in the regulation of the obligatory reserve rate of banks]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 201-214.
    6. Ronald McKinnon & Gunther Schnabl, 2012. "China and Its Dollar Exchange Rate: A Worldwide Stabilising Influence?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(6), pages 667-693, 06.
    7. M. Ayhan Kose & Kenneth Rogoff & Eswar Prasad & Shang-Jin Wei, 2003. "Effects of Financial Globalization on Developing Countries: Some Empirical Evidence," IMF Occasional Papers 220, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Marvin Goodfriend & Eswar Prasad, 2007. "A Framework for Independent Monetary Policy in China," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 53(1), pages 2-41, March.
    9. Ouyang, Alice Y. & Rajan, Ramkishen S. & Willett, Thomas D., 2010. "China as a reserve sink: The evidence from offset and sterilization coefficients," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 951-972, September.
    10. Guonan Ma & RobertN McCauley, 2008. "Efficacy Of China'S Capital Controls: Evidence From Price And Flow Data," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 104-123, 02.
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