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Alcohol and corruption

Author

Listed:
  • Azia-Dimbu, Florentin
  • Kalonda-Kanyama, Isaac
  • Kodila-Tedika, Oasis

Abstract

This study had for objective to measure the link which exists between the alcohol and the corruption, or more exactly the relation between the drinker and the corruption. In the term of this study, it seems clearly that the relation is positive between both variables. Drinkers' quantitative increase in the country tends to increase the level of the received corruption. If this relation is clear, it requires nevertheless a lot of caution as far as we do not supply an argument so robust.

Suggested Citation

  • Azia-Dimbu, Florentin & Kalonda-Kanyama, Isaac & Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2012. "Alcohol and corruption," MPRA Paper 40120, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:40120
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/40120/1/MPRA_paper_40120.pdf
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/45718/8/MPRA_paper_45718.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Axel Dreher, 2002. "Does Globalization Affect Growth?," Development and Comp Systems 0210004, EconWPA, revised 16 Jun 2003.
    2. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong Wha, 2013. "A new data set of educational attainment in the world, 1950–2010," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 184-198.
    3. José Cheibub & Jennifer Gandhi & James Vreeland, 2010. "Democracy and dictatorship revisited," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 143(1), pages 67-101, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Oasis Kodila-Tedika & Simplice Asongu, 2015. "An Empirical Note on Tribalism and Government Effectiveness," Working Papers 15/023, African Governance and Development Institute..
    2. Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-tedika, 2017. "Tribalism and Government Effectiveness," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(1), pages 156-167.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption; Alcohol; Drinkers; Institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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