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Residential stamp duty:Time for a change

  • Andrew, Mark
  • Evans, Alan
  • Koundouri, Phoebe
  • Meen, Geoffrey

In this report, we are concerned with the impact of the current system of residential stamp duty. Not only does stamp duty have an effect on the housing market, but it also discriminates between both different parts of the country and different household types. Because of the inefficiencies and inequalities of stamp duty the report also explores alternatives to the current system. We demonstrate that even modest reforms can generate significant improvements. The purpose of our report is to consider the economic rationale lying behind stamp duty. We have three broad main aims: •to consider how stamp duty measures up to general principles of optimal taxation, •to consider and quantify, where possible, the effects of stamp duty on the housing market and wider economy, •to discuss meaningful revenue-neutral alternatives to the current regime.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 38264.

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Date of creation: Apr 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:38264
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  1. James A. Berkovec & John L. Goodman, 1996. "Turnover as a Measure of Demand for Existing Homes," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 24(4), pages 421-440.
  2. Edin, P.A. & Englund, P., 1989. "Moving Cost And Housing Demand: Are Recent Movers Really In Equilibrium?," Papers 1989d, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
  3. Haurin Donald R. & Hendershott Patric H. & Kim Dongwook, 1994. "Housing Decisions of American Youth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 28-45, January.
  4. Mark Andrew & Geoffrey Meen, 2003. "House Price Appreciation, Transactions and Structural Change in the British Housing Market: A Macroeconomic Perspective," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 99-116, 03.
  5. Oskar R. Harmon & Michael J. Potepan, 1988. "Housing Adjustment Costs: Their Impact on Mobility and Housing Demand Elasticities," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 16(4), pages 459-478.
  6. Maclennan, Duncan & Muellbauer, John & Stephens, Mark, 1998. "Asymmetries in Housing and Financial Market Institutions and EMU," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(3), pages 54-80, Autumn.
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