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House Price Appreciation, Transactions and Structural Change in the British Housing Market: A Macroeconomic Perspective

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  • Mark Andrew
  • Geoffrey Meen

Abstract

This paper constitutes the first of two interrelated studies and is concerned with the relationship between house prices and transactions. Using aggregate time-series data, we find a strong relationship in Britain between the two variables, but the relationship changed during the 1990s. Transactions became much lower. We suggest that structural changes in macroeconomic relationships are increasingly likely to occur in a world of greater inequality and our results are one symptom. We argue that macroeconomic estimation needs to be complemented by careful microeconomic analysis. The second study, also appearing in this issue, therefore examines the microeconomic aspects of the issue. Copyright 2003 American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Andrew & Geoffrey Meen, 2003. "House Price Appreciation, Transactions and Structural Change in the British Housing Market: A Macroeconomic Perspective," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 99-116, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:31:y:2003:i:1:p:99-116
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    Cited by:

    1. Nicodemo, Catia & Raya, Josep Maria, 2012. "Change in the distribution of house prices across Spanish cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 739-748.
    2. Genesove, David & Han, Lu, 2012. "Search and matching in the housing market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 31-45.
    3. de Wit, Erik R. & Englund, Peter & Francke, Marc K., 2013. "Price and transaction volume in the Dutch housing market," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 220-241.
    4. Ungerer, Christoph, 2015. "Monetary Policy, Hot Housing Markets and Leverage," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2015-48, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. François Ortalo-Magné & Sven Rady, 2006. "Housing Market Dynamics: On the Contribution of Income Shocks and Credit Constraints ," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(2), pages 459-485.
    6. Mark Andrew & Alan Evans & Phoebe Koundouri & Geoffrey Meen, "undated". "Residential stamp duty:Time for a change," DEOS Working Papers 0304, Athens University of Economics and Business.
    7. Yi Jin & Charles K.Y. Leung & Zhixiong Zeng, 2012. "Real Estate, the External Finance Premium and Business Investment: A Quantitative Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 40(1), pages 167-195, March.
    8. Ball, Michael & Meen, Geoffrey & Nygaard, Christian, 2010. "Housing supply price elasticities revisited: Evidence from international, national, local and company data," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 255-268, December.
    9. Akkoyun, H. Cagri & Arslan, Yavuz & Kanik, Birol, 2013. "Housing prices and transaction volume," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 119-134.
    10. Erik R. de Wit & Peter Englund & Marc Francke, 2010. "Price and Transaction Volume in the Dutch Housing Market," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-039/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    11. Yong Tu & Seow Ong & Ying Han, 2009. "Turnovers and Housing Price Dynamics: Evidence from Singapore Condominium Market," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(3), pages 254-274, April.
    12. William Miles, 2015. "Bubbles, Busts and Breaks in UK Housing," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 18(4), pages 455-471.
    13. Lerbs, Oliver W., 2012. "House prices, housing development costs, and the supply of new single-family housing in German counties and cities," CAWM Discussion Papers 57, University of Münster, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM).
    14. Oliver W. Lerbs, 2014. "House prices, housing development costs, and the supply of new single-family housing in German counties and cities," Journal of Property Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 183-210, September.
    15. MeiChi Huang & LinYing Yeh, 2015. "Should the Fed take extra action for the recent housing bubble? Evidence from asymmetric transitory shocks," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(4), pages 762-781, October.
    16. Arslan, Yavuz & Kanık, Birol & Köksal, Bülent, 2015. "Anticipated vs. unanticipated house price movements and transaction volume," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 121-129.
    17. Oikarinen, Elias, 2012. "Empirical evidence on the reaction speeds of housing prices and sales to demand shocks," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 41-54.
    18. Jim Clayton & Norman Miller & Liang Peng, 2010. "Price-volume Correlation in the Housing Market: Causality and Co-movements," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 14-40, January.
    19. Oliver Lerbs, "undated". "House Prices, Housing Development Costs, and the Supply of New Single-Family Housing in German Counties and Cities," Working Papers 201283, Institute of Spatial and Housing Economics, Munster Universitary.
    20. Carozzi, Felipe, 2015. "Credit constraints and the composition of housing sales. Farewell to first-time buyers?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65016, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    21. Felipe Carozzi, 2015. "Credit Constraints and the Composition of Housing Sales. Farewell to First-Time Buyers?," SERC Discussion Papers 0183, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    22. Benito, Andrew, 2006. "The down-payment constraint and UK housing market: Does the theory fit the facts?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 1-20, March.
    23. Nagayasu, Jun, 2016. "Inflation and Bubbles in the Japanese Condominium Market," MPRA Paper 71192, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    24. Brian M. Peterson, 2012. "Fooled by Search: Housing Prices, Turnover and Bubbles," Staff Working Papers 12-3, Bank of Canada.

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