IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Socially determined time preference in discrete time


  • Gomes, Orlando


The aim of the paper is to develop a discrete time version of a one-sector optimal growth model with endogenous time preference. The intertemporal discount rate is determined by social factors (i.e., factors that are external to the individual agent), namely the economy wide levels of consumption and income. In continuous time, the combined effect of the previous factors is known to eventually produce local indeterminacy, instead of the well known saddle-path equilibrium of the standard Ramsey model. In discrete time, the possibility of local indeterminacy is explored under several types of Ramsey models with endogenous time preference: neo-classical and endogenous growth models, and models with production externalities and endogenous labor supply. Besides finding various possibilities regarding local dynamics, we also find that one of the models can give place to endogenous fluctuations, although this occurs only under rather exceptional circumstances.

Suggested Citation

  • Gomes, Orlando, 2007. "Socially determined time preference in discrete time," MPRA Paper 3442, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:3442

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Christiano, Lawrence J. & G. Harrison, Sharon, 1999. "Chaos, sunspots and automatic stabilizers," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 3-31, August.
    2. Jean-Pierre Drugeon, 1998. "A model with endogenously determined cycles, discounting and growth," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 12(2), pages 349-369.
    3. Caballe, Jordi & Jarque, Xavier & Michetti, Elisabetta, 2006. "Chaotic dynamics in credit constrained emerging economies," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(8), pages 1261-1275, August.
    4. Meng, Qinglai, 2006. "Impatience and equilibrium indeterminacy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 2671-2692, December.
    5. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohe, 2000. "Endogenous Business Cycles and the Dynamics of Output, Hours, and Consumption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1136-1159, December.
    6. Cellarier, Laurent, 2006. "Constant gain learning and business cycles," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 51-85, March.
    7. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    8. Guo, Jang-Ting & Lansing, Kevin J., 2002. "Fiscal Policy, Increasing Returns, And Endogenous Fluctuations," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(05), pages 633-664, November.
    9. Shane Frederick & George Loewenstein & Ted O'Donoghue, 2002. "Time Discounting and Time Preference: A Critical Review," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 351-401, June.
    10. repec:cup:macdyn:v:6:y:2002:i:5:p:633-64 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Daniel Kahneman, 2003. "Maps of Bounded Rationality: Psychology for Behavioral Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1449-1475, December.
    12. Svetlana Boyarchenko & Sergei Levendorskii, 2005. "A theory of endogenous time preference, and discounted utility anomalies," Microeconomics 0506005, EconWPA.
    13. Robert J. Barro, 1999. "Ramsey Meets Laibson in the Neoclassical Growth Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(4), pages 1125-1152.
    14. David Laibson, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-478.
    15. Epstein, Larry G., 1987. "A simple dynamic general equilibrium model," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 68-95, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Endogenous time preference; Growth models; Stability analysis; Technological externalities; Endogenous labor supply;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:3442. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.