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Simulation based estimation of threshold moving average models with contemporaneous shock asymmetry

  • Taştan, Hüseyin

Persistence of shocks to macroeconomic time series may differ depending on the sign or on whether a threshold value is crossed. For example, positive shocks to gross domestic product may be more persistent than negative shocks. Threshold (or asymmetric) moving average (TMA) models, by explicitly taking into account threshold behavior, can help discriminate whether there exists persistence asymmetry. Recently, building on the works of Wecker (1981, JASA, 76(373)) and De Gooijer (1998, JTSA, 19(1)) among others, Guay and Scaillet (2003, JBES, 21(1)) proposed TMA model in which both contemporaneous and lagged asymmetric effects are present and provided indirect inference framework for estimation and testing. This paper builds on their work and examines the properties of efficient method of moments (EMM) estimation of TMA class of models using Monte Carlo simulation experiments. The model is also applied to analyze the persistence properties of shocks in Turkish business cycles.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 34302.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:34302
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  1. Jan G. De Gooijer & Kurt Brännäs, 2004. "Asymmetries in conditional mean and variance: modelling stock returns by asMA-asQGARCH," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(3), pages 155-171.
  2. Lee, Bong-Soo & Ingram, Beth Fisher, 1991. "Simulation estimation of time-series models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2-3), pages 197-205, February.
  3. M, El Babsiri & Jean-Michel Zakoïan, 1997. "Contemporaneous Asymmetry in GARCH Processes," Working Papers 97-03, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  4. Daniel E. Sichel, 1989. "Business cycle asymmetry: a deeper look," Working Paper Series / Economic Activity Section 93, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. Kurt Brännäs & Henry Ohlsson, 1999. "Asymmetric Time Series and Temporal Aggregation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(2), pages 341-344, May.
  6. Alain Guay & Olivier Scaillet, 1999. "Indirect Inference, Nuisance Parameter and Threshold Moving Average," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 95, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
  7. Hess, Gregory D. & Iwata, Shigeru, 1997. "Asymmetric persistence in GDP? A deeper look at depth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 535-554, December.
  8. Gallant, A. Ronald & Tauchen, George, 1996. "Which Moments to Match?," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(04), pages 657-681, October.
  9. Zakoian, Jean-Michel, 1994. "Threshold heteroskedastic models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 931-955, September.
  10. Huseyin Tastan & Nuri Yildirim, 2008. "Business cycle asymmetries in Turkey: an application of Markov-switching autoregressions," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 315-333.
  11. Gonzalo, Jesus & Martinez, Oscar, 2006. "Large shocks vs. small shocks. (Or does size matter? May be so.)," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 135(1-2), pages 311-347.
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