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Regional specialization: a measure method and the trends in China

  • Lu, Zheng
  • Flegg, A.Tony
  • Deng, Xiang

This paper elaborates on a method of measuring regional specialization and examines the trend of regional specialization in China, 1987 - 2007. It constructs a simple coefficient incorporating the effect of regional industrial scale, based on location quotients, and then measures the regional specialization of China using official statistical data. The results indicate a remarkable increase in China’s overall regional specialization during this time, as well as obvious regional and industrial differences, i.e., that the regional specialization of eastern coastal China is relatively less than that of the inland. Findings further demonstrate that special-resource-dependent industries are concentrated in regions with resource endowment, whereas industries with strong technical barriers are mainly located in regions with strong research and innovation ability.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 33867.

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Date of creation: 01 Oct 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:33867
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  1. A. T. Flegg & C. D. Webber, 2000. "Regional Size, Regional Specialization and the FLQ Formula," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(6), pages 563-569.
  2. Holmes, Thomas J. & Stevens, John J., 2004. "Spatial distribution of economic activities in North America," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 63, pages 2797-2843 Elsevier.
  3. Chong-En Bai & Yingjuan Du & Zhigang Tao & Sarah Y. Tong, 2003. "Local Protectionism and Regional Specialization: Evidence from China’s Industries," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2003-565, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  4. Ellison, G. & Glaeser, E.L., 1994. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," Working papers 94-27, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  5. Marius Brülhart, 2001. "Evolving geographical concentration of European manufacturing industries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 137(2), pages 215-243, June.
  6. A. T. Flegg & C. D. Webber, 1997. "On the Appropriate Use of Location Quotients in Generating Regional Input-Output Tables: Reply," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(8), pages 795-805.
  7. Philip Mccann & John H. LL. Dewhurst, 1998. "Regional Size, Industrial Location and Input-Output Expenditure Coefficients," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(5), pages 435-444.
  8. Poncet, Sandra, 2003. "Measuring Chinese domestic and international integration," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 1-21.
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