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GDP Modelling with Factor Model: an Impact of Nested Data on Forecasting Accuracy


  • Bessonovs, Andrejs


Uncertainty associated with an optimal number of macroeconomic variables to be used in factor model is challenging since there is no criteria which states what kind of data should be used, how many variables to employ and does disaggregated data improve factor model’s forecasts. The paper studies an impact of nested macroeconomic data on Latvian GDP forecasting accuracy within factor modelling framework. Nested data means disaggregated data or sub-components of aggregated variables. We employ Stock-Watson factor model in order to estimate factors and to make GDP projections two periods ahead. Root mean square error is employed as the standard tool to measure forecasting accuracy. According to this empirical study we conclude that additional information that contained in disaggregated components of macroeconomic variables could be used to enhance Latvian GDP forecasting accuracy. The efficiency gain improving forecasts is about 0.15-0.20 percentage points of year on year quarterly growth for the forecasting period 1 quarter ahead, but for 2 quarter ahead it’s about half percentage point.

Suggested Citation

  • Bessonovs, Andrejs, 2011. "GDP Modelling with Factor Model: an Impact of Nested Data on Forecasting Accuracy," MPRA Paper 30211, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:30211

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Giovanni Caggiano & George Kapetanios & Vincent Labhard, 2011. "Are more data always better for factor analysis? Results for the euro area, the six largest euro area countries and the UK," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(8), pages 736-752, December.
    2. Boivin, Jean & Ng, Serena, 2006. "Are more data always better for factor analysis?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 132(1), pages 169-194, May.
    3. Forni, Mario, et al, 2001. "Coincident and Leading Indicators for the Euro Area," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(471), pages 62-85, May.
    4. Mario Forni & Lucrezia Reichlin, 1998. "Let's Get Real: A Factor Analytical Approach to Disaggregated Business Cycle Dynamics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(3), pages 453-473.
    5. Stock, James H & Watson, Mark W, 2002. "Macroeconomic Forecasting Using Diffusion Indexes," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(2), pages 147-162, April.
    6. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1998. "Diffusion Indexes," NBER Working Papers 6702, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Stock J.H. & Watson M.W., 2002. "Forecasting Using Principal Components From a Large Number of Predictors," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 97, pages 1167-1179, December.
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    More about this item


    Factor model; forecasting; nested data; RMSE.;

    JEL classification:

    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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