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Measuring Persistence of U.S. City Prices: New Evidence from Robust Tests

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  • Basher, Syed Abul
  • Carrion-i-Silvestre, Josep Lluis

Abstract

This paper revisits the empirical analysis in Cecchetti, Mark and Sonora (2002) involving long-span U.S. city prices, who estimated the persistence of U.S. price differentials to be around nine years. After controlling for the structural breaks in the data, we find that U.S. city price level differentials are I(0) stationary processes with the median half-life of convergence ranged between 1.5 and 2.6 years, estimates that are in accordance with what should be expected from a highly integrated economy as the United States. Our results are also robust to a pairwise tests of price level convergence.

Suggested Citation

  • Basher, Syed Abul & Carrion-i-Silvestre, Josep Lluis, 2010. "Measuring Persistence of U.S. City Prices: New Evidence from Robust Tests," MPRA Paper 22482, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:22482
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth Rogoff, 1996. "The Purchasing Power Parity Puzzle," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(2), pages 647-668, June.
    2. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Nelson C. Mark & Robert J. Sonora, 2002. "Price Index Convergence Among United States Cities," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(4), pages 1081-1099, November.
    3. Andrews, Donald W K & Chen, Hong-Yuan, 1994. "Approximately Median-Unbiased Estimation of Autoregressive Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(2), pages 187-204, April.
    4. Hiranya K. Nath & Jayanta Sarkar, 2009. "Unbiased Estimation of the Half‐Life to Price Index Convergence among U.S. Cities," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(5), pages 1041-1046, August.
    5. M. Hashem Pesaran & Ron Smith & Takashi Yamagata & Lyudmyla Hvozdyk, 2009. "Pairwise Tests of Purchasing Power Parity," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(6), pages 495-521.
    6. Bruce E. Hansen, 2001. "The New Econometrics of Structural Change: Dating Breaks in U.S. Labour Productivity," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 117-128, Fall.
    7. Hamilton, James D, 1983. "Oil and the Macroeconomy since World War II," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 228-248, April.
    8. Basher Syed A. & Carrion-i-Silvestre Josep Lluís, 2009. "Price Level Convergence, Purchasing Power Parity and Multiple Structural Breaks in Panel Data Analysis: An Application to U.S. Cities," Journal of Time Series Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(1), pages 1-38, April.
    9. Perron, Pierre, 1989. "The Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1361-1401, November.
    10. Chen, L. L. & Devereux, J., 2003. "What can US city price data tell us about purchasing power parity?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 213-222, April.
    11. Bela Balassa, 1964. "The Purchasing-Power Parity Doctrine: A Reappraisal," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72(6), pages 584-584.
    12. Robert Sonora, 2009. "City relative price convergence in the USA with structural break(s)," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(9), pages 939-944.
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    Cited by:

    1. Baharumshah & Siew-Voon Soon & Wohar, 2015. "Parity reversion in the Asian real exchange rates: new evidence from the local-persistent model," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(59), pages 6395-6408, December.
    2. Christina Christou & Juncal Cunado & Rangan Gupta, 2019. "Price Convergence Patterns across U.S. States," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 66(2), pages 187-201.
    3. repec:qut:auncer:2013_01 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Baharumshah, Ahmad Zubaidi & Soon, Siew-Voon & Hamzah, Nor Aishah, 2013. "Parity reversion in real interest rate in the Asian countries: Further evidence based on local-persistent model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 634-642.
    5. Hegwood, Natalie D. & Nath, Hiranya K., 2013. "Structural breaks and relative price convergence among US cities," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 150-160.
    6. Faik Bilgili, 2016. "City Price Convergence in Turkey with Structural Breaks," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 933-941.
    7. Hiranya K. Nath & Jayanta Sarkar, 2014. "City Relative Price Dynamics in Australia: Are Structural Breaks Important?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 90(288), pages 33-48, March.
    8. Sonora, Robert, 2010. "Asymmetries in New Keynesian Phillips Curves: Evidence from US Cities," MPRA Paper 24650, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Purchasing power parity; Price level convergence; Half-life; Multiple structural breaks; Pairwise convergence.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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