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The growing importance of risk in financial regulation


  • Ojo, Marianne


This paper traces the developments that have contributed to the importance of risk in regulation. Not only does it consider theories associated with risk, it also discusses explanations as to why risk has become so important within regulatory and governmental circles. Two forms of risk regulation, namely risk based regulation and meta regulation are considered. As well as considering the application of both in jurisdictions such as the UK, the paper places greater focus in discussing the importance of meta regulation in jurisdictions such as Germany, Italy and the US. The preference for meta regulation is based on the premises, not only of the advantages considered in this paper but also on the application of Basel II in several jurisdictions. Whilst meta regulation also has its disadvantages, the impact of risk based regulation on the use of external auditors plays a part in the preference for meta regulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Ojo, Marianne, 2009. "The growing importance of risk in financial regulation," MPRA Paper 19117, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:19117

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    More about this item


    risk; regulation; meta; Basel II; financial;

    JEL classification:

    • K2 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law

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