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Drivers of Agglomeration: geography VS. History

Author

Listed:
  • Goerlich, Francisco José
  • Mas, Matilde

Abstract

This paper focuses on the influence of two classical drivers of population agglomeration: geography and history. Geography is identified by two co-ordinates: coastal position and altitude. The prominence of history is also captured by two characteristics: the initial size of the municipalities, and their status as the administrative centre of the area. In first instance we examine localization patterns, at a small geographical scale, according to these characteristics and present empirical evidence of the progressive population concentration along the coast, on the plains and in the regional (provincial) capitals; a process that has not finished in the present days. Next, we show that both drivers of population agglomeration, geography and history, are relevant for Spain and that they show an increasing explanatory power in accounting for population concentration. From a quantitative point of view the capital status factor shows the most prominent role. An exercise of conditional convergence shows that, even in the absence of these factors, we would have seen a significant amount of population concentration but at a smaller rate. Our reference is the census population data for Spanish municipalities for the period 1900-2001. Given the important changes in municipality structure, the eleven censuses have been homogenised according to the municipal structure of the 2001 Census.

Suggested Citation

  • Goerlich, Francisco José & Mas, Matilde, 2009. "Drivers of Agglomeration: geography VS. History," MPRA Paper 15802, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2009.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:15802
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/15802/1/MPRA_paper_15802.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Luis Lanaspa & Fernando Pueyo & Fernando Sanz, 2002. "Evolution of the Spanish Urban Structure During the Twentieth Century," Documentos de Trabajo dt2002-01, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
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    3. Eaton, Jonathan & Eckstein, Zvi, 1997. "Cities and growth: Theory and evidence from France and Japan," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4-5), pages 443-474, August.
    4. Yannis M. Ioannides & Henry G. Overman, 2004. "Spatial evolution of the US urban system," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 131-156, April.
    5. Jan Eeckhout, 2004. "Gibrat's Law for (All) Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1429-1451, December.
    6. Rappaport, Jordan & Sachs, Jeffrey D, 2003. "The United States as a Coastal Nation," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 5-46, March.
    7. Goerlich, Francisco José & Mas, Matilde, 2008. "Pautas de localización de la población a lo largo del siglo XX
      [Population localization patterns along the XX century]
      ," MPRA Paper 15824, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2008.
    8. María Ayuda & Fernando Collantes & Vicente Pinilla, 2010. "Long-run regional population disparities in Europe during modern economic growth: a case study of Spain," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 44(2), pages 273-295, April.
    9. repec:hoo:wpaper:e-95-4 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Beltrán Tapia, Francisco J. & Díez-Minguela, Alfonso & Martinez-Galarraga, Julio, 2018. "Tracing the Evolution of Agglomeration Economies: Spain, 1860–1991," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 78(01), pages 81-117, March.
    2. Rafael González-Val & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat & Elisabet Viladecans-Marsal, 2017. "Market potential and city growth: Spain 1860–1960," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 11(1), pages 31-61, January.
    3. Jorge De La Roca & Diego Puga, 2017. "Learning by Working in Big Cities," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(1), pages 106-142.
    4. Diana Gutiérrez-Posada & Fernando Rubiera-Morollon & Ana Viñuela, 2017. "Heterogeneity in the Determinants of Population Growth at the Local Level," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 40(3), pages 211-240, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Population; Municipalities; Census; Agglomeration;

    JEL classification:

    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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